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Hidden Hills Estate Features ADG Custom Lighting

This gorgeous Hidden Hills estate is the epitome of quality and luxurious design. It is currently on the market for $17.5 million and listed by Marc Shevin of Berkshire Hathaway.

To accentuate and refine the design quality of the home, ADG Lighting was commissioned to design and custom manufacture lighting fixtures throughout. The wide-open floor plan prominently features high volume ceilings, glass sliding walls and magnificent picture windows which flood the home with natural light. This Hidden Hills estate offers 11,850 square feet of living space, including 6 bedrooms with an additional 2,300 square feet of living space over the four-car garage. It is loaded with amenities which include a private study, a spa with steam shower and sauna, along with a mirrored gym. There so also a 4-stall barn with turnout, as well as multiple fruit and shade trees.

ADG Lighting enjoyed the opportunity to design and build lighting throughout the home, including the gas lights on the pathway and leather-wrapped pendants featured prominently on the property.

Special Thanks to ~ Marc Shevin

Berkshire Hathaway Home Services – California Properties

From the ADG Job Site

Thanks William Hefner for having us at your beautiful midcentury reboot. We appreciate helping to design and fabricate this 17-foot long skylight. Three cheers to collaboration and working together! 

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by Gerald Olesker, CEO, ADG Lighting

 

Spiral House 100

Spiral House in Phoenix For Sale

It is not often such an iconic structure comes on the market, as a serious offering to the public. Even more so, when that structure was designed by the iconic Frank Lloyd Wright, the potential sale becomes that more attention getting. To make things even more interesting, the home was designed specifically for his son and daughter-in-law, David and Gladys Wright.

The home is currently owned by Zach Rawling and was purchased for $2.4 million in 2012. His initial plan when purchasing the home was to run it into a museum, then donate it to the School of Architecture at Taliesin. However, this plan met with stiff opposition from the neighborhood due to traffic and publicity concerns adversely affecting the neighborhood. Now, the home is on the market for $12.95 million.

The Spiral House was labeled on the original plans by Frank Lloyd Wright as a model of how to live in the Southwest. His idea for the home was to perfectly harmonize the way a building relates to its environment. The round shape became a signature of his work in later years, including the Guggenheim Museum.

Located on 5.9 acres with a view of Camelback Mountain, the Spiral House is 2,553 square feet and was built in 1952. It currently has an application pending for historic preservation. The home features three bedrooms and four baths, with a cantilevered spiral walk-up access to the house. Inside, the home features the concrete block construction with elegant Philippine mahogany accents. The property includes a 360 square-foot guest house. The signature ‘March Balloons’ carpets and furnishings in the living area were custom designed by Wright.

David and Gladys Wright often referred to the Spiral House as their Taj Mahal, and understood the uniqueness of the building they called home.

From the ADG Factory

Water-jet cut bar doors, getting a gentle oil rubdown…

Adg Custom Fixture Jobsite

by Gerald Olesker, CEO. ADG Lighting

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PRESS RELEASE: $23 Million Brentwood Home Purchased by NBA Player LeBron James

Spec Mansion Features Work of Premier Firm ADG Lighting

Los Angeles – December 21, 2017 – Another sports figure has snapped up prime real estate in the Los Angeles area — and straight from the portfolio of premier lighting firm ADG Lighting. NBA player LeBron James has purchased a newly built spec mansion for $23 million.

The contemporary European-styled home, with eight bedrooms and 9.5 bathrooms, features custom lighting by ADG. All exterior sconces and pendants were designed and manufactured by the renowned firm, in addition to the lighting in the kitchen, dining room, master bathroom, and kitchen. They also designed the brass bathroom mirrors with ball lights in the powder room.

The 16,000 square foot home is located on North Tigertail Drive in Brentwood, and comes complete with a steam room, elevator, home theater, and massage room.

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Gerald Olesker, founder and CEO of ADG Lighting, worked with interior designer Tiffany Harris of Tiffany Harris Design and listing agent Santiago Arana of The Agency. “This home was simply a masterpiece of European elegance,” said Olesker. “We’re thrilled that LeBron will be able to enjoy all the beauty the home has to offer.”

LeBron James is amongst the growing list of celebrities and sports figures who have purchased homes adorned with the lighting work of Gerald Olesker. Herb Simon, owner of the Indiana Pacers and the WNBA’s Indiana Fever, is a past client of Olesker’s.

Gerald Olesker has over 20 years experience in industrial design, and applies his background as a trained architect on all of the custom design projects he has worked on. His firm has several projects in the works across Los Angeles, Chicago, San Francisco and in major cities across Arizona, Oregon, Texas, and Florida.

ADG Lighting’s custom work can be seen in showrooms across the country, with locations in West Hollywood, Austin, and San Luis Obispo.

About ADG Lighting

With offices in Agoura Hills and Newport Beach, California, ADG Lighting works with multi-family homes, spec homes, beach homes, restaurants, hotels & resorts, and landmarks worldwide providing high caliber design and sustainable lighting solutions. Viewed millions of times online, the firm’s work has been featured in several media outlets, including 20/Twenty Architectural & Beyond, California Homes Magazine, Elle Decor, Interior Design, SFV Business Journal, Architectural Digest, Institute of Classical Architecture Publications, Wall Street Radio, Fox News Charlene on Green Hawaii, North American Design’s Green Leaders of Tomorrow, LA City Watch, LUXE Magazine + other award-winning magazines, books, programs and properties around the world.

From the Factory Floor

Silver balls headed to New York for the New Year!

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by Gerald Olesker, CEO, ADG Lighting

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Los Angeles Architecture: Can They Save Our Landmarks?

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Danny Heller’s painting, LAX Theme Building — Ground Level (2011)

Change is inevitable. Architecture is a landmark of ideas, hopes and dreams, a visual representation of the inspired (and not so inspired) thoughts of a glimpse of time. The architecture of Los Angeles tells us the story of our city. Some of those buildings remain an iconic vision, while others suffer the fate of the wrecking ball and disappear from our view.

Preserving Midcentury Modern in Los Angeles

In the middle of the traffic jammed flow of LAX stands an iconic representation of Los Angeles architecture. The space age landmark known as the Theme Building was constructed to demonstrate the futuristic vision of Los Angeles to all that transit LAX. Today, the retro cocktail lounge and restaurant have been closed to the public since 2013, but the observations deck is open to visitors. This iconic building has been part of a debate about whether to preserve or destroy some of the landmarks that make up Los Angeles. Fortunately, the building at LAX was designated as a historic-cultural monument since 1993 and thereby saved from the wrecking ball. No doubt, without that protective action, this landmark would have become a victim of developers wanting to free up valuable space in a congested LAX complex.

That is the challenge we face in Los Angeles. Our cityscape is filled with some of the finest examples of midcentury modern, Googie or Populuxe architecture. Those structures captured the streamlined form of L.A.’s aerospace ambitions. Think of the jaunty roofline of Norms on La Cienega Boulevard, which was saved from demolition last year. The diner sign, with its Jetson’s-style cometlike shapes, literally points to the optimism of the midcentury.

The Architectural Story of Los Angeles

Our architecture tells the story of our city and is a tangible reminder of a slice in our historical timeline.

“In many ways the midcentury modern–era buildings and places from the 1950s to the 1970s best tell the story of Los Angeles during its greatest period of growth and prosperity,”

Adrian Scott Fine, Director of Advocacy at the Los Angeles Conservancy

Unfortunately, the race is on. Our cultural vision is changing, and so goes our landscape. We are losing fine examples of architecture from the period. The wrecking ball brings cruel change and relagates our history to memories and pictures. Advocates like the Los Angeles Conservancy have a battle ahead. Many of iconic structures have been demolished, with many others scheduled for destruction. Will we find a way to preserve our architectural history?

From the Factory Floor

LED oil rubbed bronze fixture on the way to a Manhattan client…

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LA Architecture: The Glory of Schindler in Laurel Canyon

Perched high above Laurel Canyon in Los Angeles, is one of the finest examples of expressionistic architecture by R.M. Schindler. One of the largest homes designed by Schindler hugs the contours of the canyon, with the angles nestled into the rocky landscape.

The Bohemian Acolyte

Rudolf Michael Schindler was born on September 10, 1887, to a middle-class family in Vienna, Austria. His father was a wood and metal craftsman and an importer; his mother was a dressmaker. He attended the Imperial and Royal High School, from 1899 to 1906, and enrolled at the Vienna University of Technology before attending the Vienna Academy of Fine Arts, or Wagnerschule, graduating in 1911 with a degree in architecture. As his professional career developed, he enjoyed a relationship with the famed architect Frank Lloyd Wright.

While Schindler and Wright’s relationship ebbed and flowed through the years, Schindler was greatly influenced by the work of Wright. Schindler and Wright eventually had a falling out, and remained estranged for many years. During that time, Schindler’s designs and creativity established his credibility in the world of architecture. For over 30 years, Schindler’s designs impacted the landscape of Los Angeles and the world of architecture.

Our very own Gerald Olesker was also privileged to have worked on Wright-influenced architecture. He worked on the Mat House in Reseda, California, designed by Frank’s son Lloyd Wright and known for its distinctive angular, thatch-like roof. The house was granted historic landmark status in 1996.

Laurel Canyon Overlook

This iconic home was influenced by the Pueblo Indian adobe houses of the Southwest. Schindler made a pilgrimage to the Southwest and was profoundly inspired by the clusters of adobe houses with rounded fronts, hanging in midair in places like Mesa Verde. These influences are clearly translated in this work above Laurel Canyon. The 3,500 square foot home offers breathtaking views of the tree tops of the canyon through glass walls, offering occupants an endless source of light and beauty.

ADG Lighting Real Estate Feature

We are proud of our recent work with Robin Colton Studio on this brilliant property in Austin, Texas. This featured home is currently on the market for $4 million.

austin, texas, adg lighting, custom lighting, adglighting.com

With offices in Agoura Hills and Newport Beach, California, ADG Lighting works with multi-family homes, spec homes, beach homes, restaurants, hotels & resorts, and landmarks worldwide providing high caliber design and sustainable lighting solutions. Viewed millions of times online, the firm’s work has been featured in several media outlets, including 20/Twenty Architectural & Beyond, California Homes Magazine, Elle Decor, SFV Business Journal, Architectural Digest, Institute of Classical Architecture Publications, Wall Street Radio, Fox News Charlene on Green Hawaii, North American Design’s Green Leaders of Tomorrow, LA City Watch, LUXE Magazine + other award-winning magazines, books, programs and properties around the world.

Thomas mann house, mid-century modern, architecture

Are We Losing Another Architectural Landmark?

Could the famous Thomas Mann house by midcentury great J.R. Davidson be the next tragic teardown in Los Angeles? The Thomas Mann house is located on a large corner lot on San Remo Drive in Pacific Palisades, just north of the Riviera Country Club and about three miles from the Pacific. The home was commissioned by novelist Thomas Mann and his wife, Katia, from architect J.R. Davidson and built in 1941 on nearly an acre of land.

The Potential Loss of Architectural History

The architect, Julius Ralph Davidson or JR Davidson, was a mid-century modern American architect known for advancing modern architecture in Los Angeles and participating in Arts & Architecture magazine’s Case Study House Program. Davidson was part of a group of European expatriate architects, which included Richard Neutra, Rudolph Schindler, Kem Weber, and Paul László, who furthered modern architecture in Los Angeles in the 1930s and 40s. His modern interiors have been noted for their warmth, fluidity, and well-planned storage space. The Thomas Mann home is not on the official Los Angeles historic-cultural monuments. It is listed as a historic resource in a larger inventory called SurveyLA. The Thomas Mann Home is a work of real architectural significance, on whose design the novelist and his wife collaborated closely with Davidson. It is not just the house where Mann wrote some of his most famous work, but many feel it is a portrait of his artistic temperament and a measure of his relationship with SoCal and the architecture’s modern movement.

Is There Hope?

Unfortunately, the Thomas Mann house is being listed as a teardown at almost $15 million, without mention in the listing of its historical significance. A new citywide ordinance requires that owners seeking to demolish houses older than 45 years provide notice to neighbors and the local city council office at least 30 days in advance. But in general there are limited protections for most residential buildings in Los Angeles, even those with notable architectural pedigrees.

The Thomas Mann Home #1

Thomas mann house, mid-century modern, architecture

The Thomas Mann Home #2

Thomas mann house, mid-century modern, architecture

The Thomas Mann Home #3

Thomas mann house, mid-century modern, architecture