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Francois Perrin Architecture

Francois Perrin Defined Architectural Boundaries

Architect Francois Perrin, known as the center of gravity of Los Angeles architecture and united the design community, passed away after a long battle with cancer at age 50. As the founder of Air Architecture, the Paris-born architect worked in Southern California while remaining professionally active in France. Francois Perrin will forever be known for his creative and inventive approach to materials, and for his ability to rethink everyday life through his work.

Born in Paris, Francois Perrin would eventually settle in Los Angeles, where his design practice, Air Architecture, was well known for creating materially inventive spaces filled with ethereal physical qualities that transcended everyday experiences. His architectural projects were widely published. His Venice Air House from 2006, an addition to a single-family home that used trapped air visible through clear polycarbonate siding as a form of insulation, was well known. His Hollywood Hills house from 2012 was designed as a series of terraces that simultaneously disappeared into and were hung off of a steeply-sloped site. In 2004, the Francois Perrin project The Weather Garden changed the courtyard of Materials & Applications in Los Angeles using netting, a wooden platform, and palm tree saplings.

In 2019 at the French Consulate in Beverly Hills, Consul General bestowed on François Perrin a knighthood, Insignia of Chevalier dans l’Ordre des Arts et des Lettres.

From the ADG Factory Floor

Yes, we make furniture! This piece went to a client in San Francisco

adg-custom-furniture

by Gerald Olesker, CEO, ADG Lighting

 

 

Robert Winter Architecture

Robert Winter, The Godfather of LA Architecture Passes

“Robert Winter was in the last of a group who lived and breathed the built world of Los Angeles, the people who experienced the development of midcentury modern architecture before there was a term for it.”

Paddy Calistro, Publisher Angel City Press

Robert Winter, the most renowned Los Angeles architectural historian and the Arthur G. Coons Professor of the History of Ideas, Emeritus, at Occidental College, Los Angeles passed at the age of 94. His writings have shined a light on the region’s architectural treasures and helped define the city’s built environment. Lovingly known throughout the architectural industry as “Bungalow Bob,” he was particularly known for his contributions to the history of the California branch of the Arts and Crafts Movement. Winter was present at the creation of the Craftsman Revival in the early 1970s — a revival that, as he has famously noted, has gone on far longer than the relatively short-lived Craftsman period itself.

He was born in Indianapolis in 1924 and attended Dartmouth University and Johns Hopkins before accepting positions at UCLA and Occidental College, where he taught for more than three decades. Robert Winter was eagerly known for his architectural writing, authoring or co-authoring numerous publications over the years. His most recognized work was his collaboration with David Gebhard, titled An Architectural Guidebook to Los Angeles, which became a ‘must-own’ reference guide for architects and architectural enthusiasts since the first editions in 1965.

Robert Winter lived in The Batchelder House, which is a historic home built in 1910 and located in Pasadena. It is known as an important center of Pasadena cultural life and was designed and built by Ernest A. Batchelder, a prominent leader of the Arts and Crafts Movement.  The house is a large bungalow style home, with the woodsy design elements of a Swiss chalet.

From the ADG Jobsite

Install in progress at an auto museum in Ohio…

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by Gerald Olesker, CEO, ADG

 

Cte Stem Architecture

CTE Designates Architecture a STEM Subject

After decades of work, the discipline of architecture has been officially recognized as a STEM subject. Congress passed the STEM legislation designation and the bipartisan bill was sign into law by the  President. The American Institute of Architects (AIA) has long lobbied for the Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education (CTE) Act.

The CTE is intended to encourage a more diverse workforce and see that the promise of design as the synthesis of art and science are fulfilled through education. While architects and AIA components have been working to bring design to K-12 students through special programs and activities for years, this bill helps codify those efforts. Importantly, it exposes a new generation of students, and better prepares them for, a career in architecture.

~American Institute of Architects

STEM is an education curriculum that focuses heavily on the subjects of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. It is a growing movement in education around the world. STEM-based learning programs encourage and promote student interest in pursuing higher education and careers in those fields. STEM education typically uses a newer model of blended learning. It combines traditional classroom teaching with online learning and hands-on learning methodologies. Blended learning aims to give students the opportunity to experience different ways of learning and problem-solving. Recent studies show the U.S. ranks 38th out of 71 countries in math and 24th in science. Among the 35 members of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, the U.S. ranked 30th in math and 19th in science.

Education in STEM curriculum is crucial to the future of our children and the strength of the U.S. on a global scale. The work of the AIA on the CTE is a strong step towards a stronger future for students.  The CTE will open up more than a billion dollars in career and education grants to the states. It will modernize architecture programs, which have traditionally suffered in most education systems.

From the ADG Job Site

One of four walnut and metalized hanging progressive helix sculptures at the San Manuel Casino!

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by Gerald Olesker, CEO, ADG Lighting

Caed Vellum Architecture

CAED Cal Poly Hosts Design Exhibition

The 15th Annual Vellum Furniture Design Exhibition will be held on November 2nd and 3rd in San Luis Obispo and is a must see! The event is being co-hosted between Cal Poly Architecture and Environmental Design (CAED) school and Vellum Build Design.

It will feature 195 participant entries from students at CAED, who have been asked to conceive and construct furniture projects with tables, chairs, light fixtures, toys and other furniture designs. Their work will be judged by a panel of experts on function, individuality and beauty. The top project will be awarded the Milano Grand Prize and will travel to Milan, Italy in April for the Salone Internazionale del Mobile, the largest furniture fair in the world.

The competition provides students of CAED the opportunity to engage in real-life design situations, such as managing budgets, materials, fabricators and manufacturers. It also challenges them to meet real-life timelines, deadlines and construction schedules, all of which are not incorporated into the typical academic experience.

The Cal Poly acclaimed College of Architecture and Environmental Design (CAED) offers a unique blend of eight degree programs in five related departments. The CAED programs include architecture, architectural engineering, regional and city planning, construction management and landscape architecture. The school has a 70-year history, with over 16,000 alumni, who have been a driving force shaping the planning, design and construction disciplines.

From the ADG Jobsite

One of several custom tables made for a high rise entry space in San Francisco.

adg furniture

by Gerald Olesker, CEO, ADG Lighting

pritzker architecture prize, Stephen Breyer

Pritzker Architecture Prize Committee Now Led By Supreme Court Justice

Supreme Court Justice Stephen Breyer has been named as the chairman of the prestigious Pritzker Architecture Prize committee by the family that sponsors the prize. He will head a seven member jury of experts from around the globe. Tom Pritzker, executive chairman of the Chicago-based Hyatt Hotels Corp, stated:

“His devotion to civic-minded architecture underscores the mission of the prize and his unparalleled ability to guide a group deliberation is essential in creating a unified voice within this diverse and internal panel of jurors.”

The Pritzker Architecture Prize is awarded annually to honor a living architect or those architects who have distinguished themselves through work that displays commitment, talent and vision in architecture. The award was founded in 1979 by Jay and Cindy Pritzker and is funded by the Pritzker family, with the Hyatt Foundation serving as a corporate sponsor. It is most often referred to as the Nobel Prize of Architecture and has a steadfast reputation for recognizing architects irrespective of race, nationality or ideology. Some of the most notable architects who have received the coveted award include Frank Gehry and I.M. Pei.

Supreme Court Justice Stephen Breyer was born in San Francisco in 1938 and attended Harvard Law School, where he joined the Harvard Law Review and graduated magna cum laude in 1964. He went on to teach as Harvard Law for over two decades. He subsequently served as an assistant prosecutor during the Watergate hearings and was sworn in to the Supreme Court by President Bill Clinton in 1994. Justice Breyer has never studied architecture, but has a long-standing devotion and interest in the field. In 1999, he was one of  the two judges who served as advisors to the architects of the federal courthouse in Boston which opened in 1999. He has been a distinguished member of the Pritzker Architecture Prize jury since 2011.

From the ADG Jobsite

A collaboration with M. Elle Design

 adg lighting m elle designs

by Gerald Olesker, CEO, ADG Lighting

 

Jack Laxer

The Passing of Architectural Photographer Jack Laxer

Jack Laxer spent the past six decades making his name as the most prolific and iconic architecture photographer of the 20th century.  He made his name focusing on the photography of Googie architecture, specifically in Los Angeles. His artistic talent and creative eye captured the essence and feel of the mid-century modern movement in and around Los Angeles. 

Googie architecture is a form of modern architecture and originated in Southern California in the late 1940s. It was a popular form of architecture with gas stations, coffee houses and motels. It later became known as mid-century modern architecture, which represented the populace style. Googie architecture features include upswept roofs, geometric shapes and very bold use of glass, steel and neon. Jack Laxer captured the style and form of the movement throughout the Los Angeles region.

His photographs of California modern architecture have been published in magazines and books, displayed in museums, and included in educational programs since the 1950s. He photographed the homes of Lucille Ball and Harold Lloyd with the Stereo Realist camera.      

He captured the architecture of Southern California in vivid color, sometimes even in three dimensions. He was 3D before 3D was cool. His subject matter perfectly embodies the spirit of modernism, both as an artistic movement as well as an everyday reality in postwar Los Angeles. 

Jack Laxer passed away in Culver City at the age of 91. He not only photographed Googie architecture, but found artistic inspiration in backyard parties, chemical molecules and other bits of life that brought us all joy. In 2009, he was awarded the Modern Master award by the Los Angeles Conservancy and had the honor to be a featured speaker at the Googie World Expo.      

His amazing views offer a full-color, 3D glimpse into a world that no longer exists, even as we drive by it every day.

From the Factory Floor

Finishing the powdercoat for these Belair beauties!
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by Gerald Olesker, CEO, ADG Lighting

 

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