adg lighting - architectural detail group

Monthly Archives: February 2019

paradise-wildfire

Paradise Reimagined

Paradise, California was the living embodiment of its name. It was surrounded by miles of beautiful forest, mountain streams and clean air. It was just the place to unplug, refresh and relax in one of the most scenic locations in California. All of that picturesque beauty went up in flames during the Camp Fire in November 2018.

For Paradise, this fire devastated not only their property, but their community and the future of the residents for generations to come. It was complete and total devastation. The Camp Fire has gone down as the worst wildfire since the Cloquet fire in 1918, and is on the global record as one of the deadliest fires in history.

With the help of Cal Poly College of Architecture & Environmental Design, you will see Paradise reimagined and the scenic community rise from the ashes of devastation. Students traveled to Paradise earlier this year and spent time in the region and with community members to better understand their needs and what their vision for the future was. Led by Stacey White, Cal Poly faculty and lecturer in the architecture school, the students embarked on a design and rebuilding plan for Paradise that focused on the vision of the residents to give them their community back.

On February 22nd, Cal Poly students met with the residents of Paradise in Chico to present their initial ideas and get feedback from the community. The students presented 36 projects for review. The students will take this information back to Cal Poly and refine those projects down from 36 to 20 final projects. The groups will meet again in April to discuss and refine the final 20. The final projects will then be submitted to the community of Paradise in June for community approval.

The architecture students from Cal Poly are truly giving back to the residents of Paradise and the state of California in ways that just cannot be measured in dollars and cents. These students embody the spirit of California and the architecture profession.  

From the ADG Jobsite

We designed the furniture and covered window panels depicting familiar California scenes at the Farmer’s Insurance Agency in Granada Hills…

ADG jobsite custom lighting

by Gerald Olesker, CEO, ADG Lighting   

Marseille Port France Architecture

Marseille Enjoys A Rebirth of the Historic Grand Port

The historic Grand Port of Marseille was founded more than 2,500 years ago. It has a rich history of vigorous independence asserted against central authority in a variety of forms. It retained its status as a free city even after falling to Julius Caesar’s troops in the 1st century BC.

Marseille has commissioned a bold project to renew the rich history of the Grand Port; the new project is dubbed J1 La Passerelle and is a 29,106 square foot mixed-use structure just minutes away from Musée des Civilisations de l’Europe et de la Méditerranée (MUCEM).

The new mixed-use structure will be located minutes away from the iconic Musée des Civilisations de l’Europe et de la Méditerranée (MUCEM). It will offer multiple restaurants and retail outlets, as well as a 130-room hotel, rounding out the property’s leisure offerings, along with extensive recreational amenities, including a floating pool, climbing wall, sports room, public promenade, spa, and water park. The Grand Port of Marseille currently enjoys over 2 million visitors a year from cruise ship traffic and is the busiest terminal in France. Marseille enjoys a millennia-old legacy as an epicenter of travel and commerce in the region. The new project would significantly enhance the attraction of the Grand Port and would evoke the memories of the adventurous voyages of the past.

“Marseille would finally get to know a new life worthy of its past.”

Jean-Claude Gaudin, Mayor of Marseille

The French architecture firm Reichen and Robert (RR&A) have been selected to spearhead the $113.4 million dollar project, with groundbreaking scheduled for the year 2021. It is time to set sail!

From the ADG Jobsite

Tukut Lounge at San Manuel Casino, in collaboration with Shema Dougall Design Associates. Sculptural fixtures fabricated on walnut with metalized edges…

adg-custom-lighting-commercial

by Gerald Olesker, CEO, ADG Lighting

 

Robert Winter Architecture

Robert Winter, The Godfather of LA Architecture Passes

“Robert Winter was in the last of a group who lived and breathed the built world of Los Angeles, the people who experienced the development of midcentury modern architecture before there was a term for it.”

Paddy Calistro, Publisher Angel City Press

Robert Winter, the most renowned Los Angeles architectural historian and the Arthur G. Coons Professor of the History of Ideas, Emeritus, at Occidental College, Los Angeles passed at the age of 94. His writings have shined a light on the region’s architectural treasures and helped define the city’s built environment. Lovingly known throughout the architectural industry as “Bungalow Bob,” he was particularly known for his contributions to the history of the California branch of the Arts and Crafts Movement. Winter was present at the creation of the Craftsman Revival in the early 1970s — a revival that, as he has famously noted, has gone on far longer than the relatively short-lived Craftsman period itself.

He was born in Indianapolis in 1924 and attended Dartmouth University and Johns Hopkins before accepting positions at UCLA and Occidental College, where he taught for more than three decades. Robert Winter was eagerly known for his architectural writing, authoring or co-authoring numerous publications over the years. His most recognized work was his collaboration with David Gebhard, titled An Architectural Guidebook to Los Angeles, which became a ‘must-own’ reference guide for architects and architectural enthusiasts since the first editions in 1965.

Robert Winter lived in The Batchelder House, which is a historic home built in 1910 and located in Pasadena. It is known as an important center of Pasadena cultural life and was designed and built by Ernest A. Batchelder, a prominent leader of the Arts and Crafts Movement.  The house is a large bungalow style home, with the woodsy design elements of a Swiss chalet.

From the ADG Jobsite

Install in progress at an auto museum in Ohio…

IMG 9819

by Gerald Olesker, CEO, ADG

 

usc-adg-custom-lighting

A USC Architectural ‘Whodunit’

Most folks love a good mystery! A twisting, turning plot that gets more complicated at every turn. Details become more blurred and facts become elusive in the best mystery. Now, the plot thickens around a story that involves USC, Samuel and Harriet Freeman and the work of Frank Lloyd Wright and Rudolph Schindler.

Samuel and Harriet Freeman commissioned Wright to design their home in the Hollywood Hills into an epic showplace for them. Wright did just that! He designed a breathtaking home and ringed the living room with tall windows that provided stunning views of Highland Avenue and the surrounding hills. Among the furnishings he designed for the home were six-foot tall iron lamps. Later, Schindler added his touches to the residence with his own unique furnishings. Samuel died in 1981 and Harriet passed in 1986. Their luxurious home and furnishings were left to the USC School of Architecture, trusting they would treasure the property as a site for meetings, classes and historic preservation.  Ah, the best-laid plans!

Over the years, USC School of Architecture quickly found out the true expense of maintaining and preserving this treasure and its contents. In 1994, the home was severely damaged in the Northridge Earthquake. It took over eight years to secure $1 million dollars from FEMA for the restoration work. In 2000, USC secured a warehouse with a large open space and one lockable storage room. The contents of the home were moved into storage and the lamps and sofa were locked into the smaller storage space. For 10 years, the contents sat in storage, sometimes glimpsed by USC faculty, staff and students. The plot thickens!

In 2012, USC staffers noticed the lamps and sofa missing. There was only one key in existence and no signs of forced entry or vandalism. Despite the obvious value of the items taken, no one at USC filed a report with campus police, LAPD or the university’s insurance carriers. Talk of the theft circulated among some at the architecture school, but few outsiders had any knowledge. Ultimately, someone with some intimate knowledge of the theft sent an anonymous email to the LA Times tipping them off. The Times worked with USC on the information and the school found enough validity in the information to finally formally report and investigate the crime. USC Police reported the incident to the LAPD in mid-January for investigation.

Now that the investigation is in the appropriate hands, this incident has created a great deal of concern for USC, the USC School of Architecture and the architecture community at large. The value of the missing items is considerable and classify this incident as a felony. It is the hope of most professionals that the items are recovered and returned to a restored property that pays respect to Samuel and Harriet Freeman, along with Wright and Schindler. The question remains — Whodunit?

From the ADG Factory Floor

 Customized LED color change lens installed into ring pendant…

Adg Lighting Factory 

by Gerald Olesker, CEO, ADG Lighting