adg lighting - architectural detail group

Category Archives: Bel Air

Francois Perrin Architecture

Francois Perrin Defined Architectural Boundaries

Architect Francois Perrin, known as the center of gravity of Los Angeles architecture and united the design community, passed away after a long battle with cancer at age 50. As the founder of Air Architecture, the Paris-born architect worked in Southern California while remaining professionally active in France. Francois Perrin will forever be known for his creative and inventive approach to materials, and for his ability to rethink everyday life through his work.

Born in Paris, Francois Perrin would eventually settle in Los Angeles, where his design practice, Air Architecture, was well known for creating materially inventive spaces filled with ethereal physical qualities that transcended everyday experiences. His architectural projects were widely published. His Venice Air House from 2006, an addition to a single-family home that used trapped air visible through clear polycarbonate siding as a form of insulation, was well known. His Hollywood Hills house from 2012 was designed as a series of terraces that simultaneously disappeared into and were hung off of a steeply-sloped site. In 2004, the Francois Perrin project The Weather Garden changed the courtyard of Materials & Applications in Los Angeles using netting, a wooden platform, and palm tree saplings.

In 2019 at the French Consulate in Beverly Hills, Consul General bestowed on François Perrin a knighthood, Insignia of Chevalier dans l’Ordre des Arts et des Lettres.

From the ADG Factory Floor

Yes, we make furniture! This piece went to a client in San Francisco

adg-custom-furniture

by Gerald Olesker, CEO, ADG Lighting

 

 

Paul Williams Lax Architecture

Paul Williams and Los Angeles Architecture

When exploring the greater Los Angeles area, some of the most remarkable architecture was from the creative vision of architect Paul Williams. He was a major contributor to the architectural landscape of the city that lives on today.

Paul Williams was a master of many styles, from English Tudor to Spanish Colonial and the casual California ranch style. He dedicated his work to enhancing people’s lives by designing architecture with the local climate and light in mind. A-listers such as Denzel Washington and Ellen DeGeneres have lived in Williams’ homes. Hotel heir Barron Hilton currently lives in a distinct Bel Air home, which Williams and interior design partner Harriet Shellenberger originally designed for businessman Jacob “Jay” Paley. The Paley Residence became widely known for its magnificent pool, featuring sandy beach areas, beautiful imported mosaic tile work and an overall emphasis on outdoor living spaces reflective of a Southern California lifestyle. Even though he quickly became known as the architect to the stars, he was also involved in the conceptual design and redesign of many iconic L.A. landmarks such as the LAX Theme Building, the Golden State Mutual Life Insurance Building, the Shrine Auditorium, the Beverly Hills Hotel, and the First African Methodist Episcopal Church.

A graduate of the University of Southern California, he became the first black member of the American Institute of Architects (AIA) and over the course of his lifetime participated in nearly 3,000 projects. In December 2016, Williams was posthumously awarded the 2017 AIA Gold Medal. He was the first African-American architect to receive the prestigious honor.

The iconic work of Paul Williams cannot be understated, and proper respect must be paid to his innovation and creativity. Janna Ireland just authored a fine narrative pictorial in Curbed Los Angeles on the work of Paul Williams. It is a great narrative of the life and times of Paul Williams, accompanied by a pictorial history she has documented over the past three years.

From the ADG Jobsite  

The Garden lantern…

adg-jobsite-custom-lighting

by Gerald Olesker, CEO, ADG Lighting

Robert Winter Architecture

Robert Winter, The Godfather of LA Architecture Passes

“Robert Winter was in the last of a group who lived and breathed the built world of Los Angeles, the people who experienced the development of midcentury modern architecture before there was a term for it.”

Paddy Calistro, Publisher Angel City Press

Robert Winter, the most renowned Los Angeles architectural historian and the Arthur G. Coons Professor of the History of Ideas, Emeritus, at Occidental College, Los Angeles passed at the age of 94. His writings have shined a light on the region’s architectural treasures and helped define the city’s built environment. Lovingly known throughout the architectural industry as “Bungalow Bob,” he was particularly known for his contributions to the history of the California branch of the Arts and Crafts Movement. Winter was present at the creation of the Craftsman Revival in the early 1970s — a revival that, as he has famously noted, has gone on far longer than the relatively short-lived Craftsman period itself.

He was born in Indianapolis in 1924 and attended Dartmouth University and Johns Hopkins before accepting positions at UCLA and Occidental College, where he taught for more than three decades. Robert Winter was eagerly known for his architectural writing, authoring or co-authoring numerous publications over the years. His most recognized work was his collaboration with David Gebhard, titled An Architectural Guidebook to Los Angeles, which became a ‘must-own’ reference guide for architects and architectural enthusiasts since the first editions in 1965.

Robert Winter lived in The Batchelder House, which is a historic home built in 1910 and located in Pasadena. It is known as an important center of Pasadena cultural life and was designed and built by Ernest A. Batchelder, a prominent leader of the Arts and Crafts Movement.  The house is a large bungalow style home, with the woodsy design elements of a Swiss chalet.

From the ADG Jobsite

Install in progress at an auto museum in Ohio…

IMG 9819

by Gerald Olesker, CEO, ADG

 

New Year 2019 100

The Best of ADG for 2018

 

New year — a new chapter, new verse, or just the same old story? Ultimately we write it. The choice is ours.

~Alex Morritt

We want to take this opportunity to review some of the Best of ADG for 2018. Every end marks a new beginning. Keep your spirits and determination unshaken, and you will always walk the glory road. With courage, faith and great effort, you shall achieve everything you desire. We wish you a Happy New Year!

~ The ADG Team

The Best of ADG 2018

Paul Williams Shaped the Face of Los Angeles Architecture

Paulwilliams Architect Historical

The Broadway District Rises Again

Broadway District Los Angeles

 

 

 

 


Pritzker Architecture Prize Committee Now Led By Supreme Court Justice

Stephen Breyer


The Noted Passing of Gene Leedy

Leedy Architect


Beverly Center 2

Beverly Center Shows off a New Image

The Beverly Center is showing off a new facelift and revitalization on November 1st. The mid-city landmark first opened in July 1982, and showed off a unique design presence for the area. The unusual shape of the mall was a result of its position at the intersection of a number of angled local streets and the salt lake oilfield.

The new look of the Beverly Center will improve and enhance the aesthetic qualities of the landmark, with moving surfaces that replace the original static facade. The new surface will feature wavelike movement, which reflects the surrounding urban landscape. This effect is achieved through the use of a vertical series of throbbing LEDs, which create the wavy effect. The combination of new surfaces and LEDs dematerializes the volume of light and color, decomposing them and altering the viewer’s perception of the building in both day and night.

Visitors will enter into large brightly lit open spaces surrounded by the three story design of the mall, featuring breathtaking skylights. The skylight allows the flow of natural light to expand into all areas of the mall, including the first level and commercial meeting spaces. From the pleasant promenade inside the building, a panoramic terrace on the mall’s roof strengthens the relationship between inside and out, and welcomes both visitors and occupants of the surrounding areas to use it.

Beverly Center has been an iconic building in mid-city, drawing locals and tourists to this shopping mecca for decades. Withe the newest renovation and facelift, the area will continue to enjoy the upscale shopping and meeting center for the area. It will continue to reflect the innovation and lifeblood of Los Angeles for many decades to come.

From the Factory Floor

Sneak peak of our cast bronze art deco chandelier!

IMG 9280

by Gerald Olesker, CEO, ADG Lighting

Los Angeles City Hall Architecture

Los Angeles Appoints the First Chief Design Officer

The City of Los Angeles and Mayor Eric Garcetti have taken a bold step and appointed the first Chief Design Officer for the city. Because of the scale and pace of development of the city, Mayor Garcetti feels strongly about having a focus on the future while balancing the need for development and the importance of keeping the face of the city inspired. The challenges the city faces are vast; expanding the Metro system, Olympic infrastructure improvements and the desperate need to address the housing and homeless crisis. This is an area where the city has traditionally struggled.

Christopher Hawthorne was the architecture critic for the Los Angeles Times from 2004 to March of this year. Before coming to the LA Times, he was architecture critic for Slate and a frequent contributor to The New York Times. He is the co- author of The Green House: New Directions in Sustainable Architecture. Hawthorne grew up in Berkeley and has a bachelor’s degree from Yale. His vision for the new role is to make the city more beautiful, inclusive and efficient.

From the the Walt Disney Concert Hall and the Broad Museum, or the beautiful angles of a modernist home next to a striking building outfitted with the minarets of a temple, Los Angeles architecture is unique and inspiring. The wonderful weather and the beautiful people found in Los Angeles have long inspired breathtaking architecture and a great number of dreamers and eccentrics. Frank Gehry and Frank Lloyd Wright were among the visionaries who came to Los Angeles and left their indelible mark on this City of Angels.

In an era of increased public awareness about urbanism, it makes sense that the people driving the discourse should be in a position to change things for the better. Making that happen, however, is incumbent on mayors and other officials. Inviting critics to become part of the city-building process is the first step; listening to them and giving them real authority has to come next.

From the ADG Jobsite

Gorgeous entry doors

IMG 7940

by Gerald Olesker, CEO, ADG Lighting

SaveSave

SaveSave