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Monthly Archives: June 2018

world architecture festival

World Architecture Festival 2018 in Amsterdam

The World Architecture Festival was first held in 2008. It is a three day festival and awards competition dedicated to celebrating architecture from across the globe. During the first four years, the festival was held in Barcelona, and since 2012 in Singapore. Each year, hundreds of projects are entered in the competition for the awards and more than 200 of these are shortlisted for live presentation at the festival. All the presentations of the entries are collected in the World Buildings Directory. The architects pay a submission fee to enter a project for a WAF Award and travel to where the festival is arranged to present the project live if it is shortlisted. The entries are voluntary and the festival does not control who submits projects.  

This year, the festival will be held in Amsterdam on Nov 28-30. The shortlist for their 2018 awards features 536 projects ranging from small family homes, to schools, stations, museums, large infrastructure and landscape projects. Known as the world’s largest architectural award program, the WAF Awards saw more participation this year than ever before, with more than 1000 entries received from projects located in 81 countries across the world. 

The 2018 World Architecture Festival Super Jury

Christopher Brandon, Managing Principal, Perkins & Will

Nigel Coates, Director, Nigel Coates Firm

Päivi Meuronen, Interior architect, JKMM Architects

Lyndon Neri, Founding Partner, Neri & Hu Design

Nesna Petresin, Visiting Fellow at Goldsmiths, University of London

From the ADG Jobsite

Custom square acrylic chandelier and pyrex and brass outdoor lights

by Gerald Olesker, CEO, ADG Lighting

 

 

Alfred Eichler, The Architect of California

The work of Alfred Eichler reflected the spirit and diversity of California. During his time as an architect for the state, Eichler designed buildings which reflected the everyday lives of a ‘modern’ citizen. There was no grandiose flash in his design, but a subtle sophistication that people just felt comfortable with. Even though his name is not widely known, his projects dot the landscape of this great state and serve the people who call it home.

Alfred Eichler was born to Dr. Alfred Eichler Sr. and Laura Eichler in Shadyside, Missouri in 1895. Just after his birth, his parents moved the family to San Francisco, where he grew up with his siblings. At age 13, Eichler contracted spinal meningitis, which left him deaf. However, his disability didn’t hamper his motivation or drive for creative success in the future. Eichler attended St. Ignatius College Preparatory in San Francisco before studying at Columbia University and the Beaux Arts Institute of Design in New York. After completing his studies, he went on to serve his country in the Navy, where he functioned as a civil architect during WWI. After his service in the Navy, Eichler worked in private firms in New York, Washington D.C., and San Francisco. He was later hired as the Senior Architectural Designer for the Division of Architecture of California’s Department of Public Works. In 1949, he was promoted to Supervisory Architect in the Design Section until his retirement in 1963.

List of Notable Projects

  • San Quentin State Prison – Hospital addition
  • San Quentin State Prison – Cell block & solitary confinement
  • San Quentin State Prison – Dormitory & prison yard
  • San Quentin State Prison – Women’s cell block
  • California Institution for Women  – Tehachapi
  • Folsom State Prison – New cell blocks
  • Folsom State Prison – Chinese and Negro Dormitory
  • State Reform School – Preston School of Industry
  • Fred C. Nelles School for Boys – Gymnasium
  • Ventura School for Girls
  • Stockton State Hospital
  • Camarillo State Hospital
  • Napa State Hospital
  • Mendocino State Hospital

His work went well beyond prison and hospital designs. He completed work for state parks, the State Fair Ground, Veterans Homes and the Sacramento Tower Bridge. One of the most notable parts of his work were the drawings and watercolor renderings of his projects. Each one was a simply stated and clean rendering, but deeply creative and artistic. The watercolors especially captured the essence and feel of the specific structure he was depicting. The watercolors of public use buildings accurately reflected the colors of California. On the other hand, the renderings of confinement facilities were more more dark and somber, reflecting the spirit of the work.

Learn more about Alfred Richler here.

   From the Factory Floor

Design for a new hotel in San Luis Obispo launching this year! 

by Gerald Olesker, CEO, ADG Lighting

Featured Professional – Ian Saude, Ian Saude Lifestyle

Ian Saudē was born in Hollywood, California and was raised on California’s idyllic Central Coast. He attended the University of California at Berkeley and studied English Literature and Classics, graduating Phi Beta Kappa, magna cum laude. Soon after, he moved to Katmandu, Nepal principally to study Tibetan Buddhist philosophy and meditation techniques with several of its greatest living masters. This is still his single greatest passion. While in Katmandu, inspired by the ancient traditions of craftsmanship, Ian Saudē indulged his abiding love of art and design by collaborating with local artisans, metal smiths and weavers to create jewelry and objects which formed the basis for his first accessories collection – so dividing his time between his new work, and other educational, spiritual and charitable pursuits.

Ian also has a beautiful line of handwoven rugs and bronze work displayed in his San Luis Obispo showroom. You can learn more about his showroom here!

Jack Laxer

The Passing of Architectural Photographer Jack Laxer

Jack Laxer spent the past six decades making his name as the most prolific and iconic architecture photographer of the 20th century.  He made his name focusing on the photography of Googie architecture, specifically in Los Angeles. His artistic talent and creative eye captured the essence and feel of the mid-century modern movement in and around Los Angeles. 

Googie architecture is a form of modern architecture and originated in Southern California in the late 1940s. It was a popular form of architecture with gas stations, coffee houses and motels. It later became known as mid-century modern architecture, which represented the populace style. Googie architecture features include upswept roofs, geometric shapes and very bold use of glass, steel and neon. Jack Laxer captured the style and form of the movement throughout the Los Angeles region.

His photographs of California modern architecture have been published in magazines and books, displayed in museums, and included in educational programs since the 1950s. He photographed the homes of Lucille Ball and Harold Lloyd with the Stereo Realist camera.      

He captured the architecture of Southern California in vivid color, sometimes even in three dimensions. He was 3D before 3D was cool. His subject matter perfectly embodies the spirit of modernism, both as an artistic movement as well as an everyday reality in postwar Los Angeles. 

Jack Laxer passed away in Culver City at the age of 91. He not only photographed Googie architecture, but found artistic inspiration in backyard parties, chemical molecules and other bits of life that brought us all joy. In 2009, he was awarded the Modern Master award by the Los Angeles Conservancy and had the honor to be a featured speaker at the Googie World Expo.      

His amazing views offer a full-color, 3D glimpse into a world that no longer exists, even as we drive by it every day.

From the Factory Floor

Finishing the powdercoat for these Belair beauties!
IMG 8450
by Gerald Olesker, CEO, ADG Lighting

 

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southern California, architecture

The Crazy Architecture of Southern California

Southern California is home to the movie capital of the world. Creativity and imagination is what inspires our culture and our economy. The environment of make-believe allows entrepreneurial spirits to create environments and products that allow us to get lost in our imaginations. These inspirations could not be lost on the architectural world in our region. A British traveler noted after a visit to Southern California in the 1930’s that either “we had lost our minds or he had stumbled into a fantasy universe.” So was the influence of mimetic architecture in Southern California.

The practice of mimetic architecture, also known as novelty or programmatic architecture, is a style of building design popularized in the United States in the first half of the 20th century. It is characterized by unusual building designs that mimic the purpose or function of the building, or the product it is associated with. Mimetic architecture was particularly popular between the 1920s and 1950s, as cars became widespread and freeways were built across America. Some roadside architecture started to be seen as a means for advertising to passing cars. For example, a roadside restaurant might be designed in the shape of a giant hot dog, a coffee shop in the shape of a coffee pot, or a fruit stand in the shape of a piece of fruit.

“If, when you went shopping, you found you could buy cakes in a windmill, ices in a gigantic cream-can, flowers in a huge flowerpot, you might begin to wonder whether you had not stepped through a looking glass or taken a toss down a rabbit burrow and could expect Mad Hatter or White Queen to appear round the next corner.”

British tourist visiting LA, 1930’s

From the iconic Brown Derby, to the numerous wigwam hotels that dotted the region, to giant donuts, ice cream and hotdogs, Southern California have been replete with some of the finest examples of mimetic architecture. While none of these buildings were terribly important in the historical value of the region, others were iconic landmarks that will remain etched in our historical memories and evoke the culture and feel of the Southern California lifestyle.

From the ADG Jobsite

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by Gerald Olesker, CEO, ADG Lighting

 

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