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Midtown Center 100

Midtown Center in Washington DC

Midtown Center is located at the corner of L Street Northwest and 15th Street Northwest, on the site of the old Washington Post, which was razed in 2016. Three elevated walkways link two wings of the U-shaped, glass-faced office building. Midtown Center was designed by SHoP Architects, just four blocks from the White House in the heart of Washington DC.

This innovative addition to the DC landscape is a 14 story U-shaped building, encompassing 865,000 square feet and serves as the headquarters of Fannie Mae. Beyond meeting the needs of Fannie Mae, the aim of the Midtown Center project was to create a building that helps energize this part of the city. One of the most welcoming features is the open and expansive public plaza, with retail and dining enterprises that bring the space to life. The courtyard features intimate gathering areas, a sunken granite fountain, and angled pathways that connect with the surrounding neighborhood.

High above the public plaza are three angular sky bridges connecting the towers, which help to animate the public plaza below. The façades of the building are sheathed in glass, allowing natural light to penetrate the interior workspaces. The copper accents on the exterior pay homage to local design traditions in Washington DC. It will develop a patina over time and is used throughout, adding a deep texture to the skybridges.

In the planning of Midtown Center, SHoP Architects took their inspiration from the original master plan for Washington DC by Pierre Charles L’Enfant. They created a building that allows visitors to angle strategically across the site and engage with it in new ways.  

From the Factory Floor

Handmade art deco chain getting ready for Bel Air!

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by Gerald Olesker, CEO, ADG Lighting

 

 

Bloomberg Architecture400

Bloomberg European Headquarters Wins Stirling Prize

 

Located in the heart of London, near the Bank of England and Saint Paul’s Cathedral, this two-building structure has won the Stirling prize, which is the UK’s most prestigious architecture award. The Stirling Prize is awarded annually by the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA). In a unanimous decision, the Bloomberg building won over five other finalists. Ben Derbyshire, RIBA President stated that:

“This building is a profound expression of confidence in British architecture — and perfectly illustrates why the UK is the profession’s global capital. This role and reputation must be maintained, despite the political uncertainty of Brexit.”

Designed by Foster + Partners with sustainability in mind, it is also recognized as the top-rated major office building in the world based on BREEAM standards.  The inspiration for the building was to create a cutting-edge design that would push the boundaries of accepted design and set new standards for openness and sustainability, while honoring London’s history. The building uses 73% less water and 35% less energy than a typical office building because of the latest innovations in power, lighting and water imagined in the design. The airflow is automatically adjusted by smart sensors, based on the number of people occupying each area of the building at any given time. This alone reduces CO2 emissions by 300 metric tons annually, plus another 500-750 metric tons are reduced by a unique heat/power generation unit which reuses its own waste heat for cooling and heating the building.

The Bloomberg HQ is not only the standard for sustainability, it is just plain gorgeous. The first thing you notice is the sandstone facade, which is accented by large bronze fins which vary in pitch and scale according to orientation and solar exposure, which provide both shade and ventilation. At the center of the site is a pedestrian arcade which re-establishes an ancient Roman road and a museum which displays the Roman temple of Mithras, which was discovered on the site 60 years ago.

Visitors to the Bloomberg HQ enter a two story artwork made from curved timber shells called the Vortex. The entire flow through the building is choreographed by art. The heart of the building is the 6th floor ‘Pantry’ which encompasses a large concourse and cafe space that offer panoramic views of the city. A distinctive bronze ramps spirals down to the office floors below the ‘Pantry,’ which was designed to encourage, by chance, walk and talk meetings that are comfortable and collaborative. The high-tech offices have ceilings fitted with 2.5 million aluminum petals, which regulate acoustics, temperature and light.

In its 23rd year, the RIBA Stirling Prize is awarded to the architect of the most signifcant building of the year. The award criteria is based upon factors such as design vision, innovation, originality, accessibility, sustainability and the capacity to stimulate.

  From the Factory Floor

 A little inspiration…

Adg Custom Factory Lighting

 

by Gerald Olesker, CEO, ADG Lighting

20 SR17102261 5 1497473071 Copy 1019x597

ADG Lighting Custom Fixture Featured On Dering Hall

ADG Lighting designs, fabricates and manufactures lighting fixtures, architectural ornamentation, and metal work in all styles. Our versatility can be seen in our wide range of work on a number of residential and commercial properties. The versatility of our work includes projects in transitional architecture, traditional architecture, contemporary architecture, historic architecture, and high-end architecture.

Dering Hall offers an entirely new approach to furnishing a home—and one that makes hunting for that perfect bespoke sideboard a dynamic and enjoyable experience. Our partnership is ideal, as we offer unique and creative design solutions for a discriminating clientele. We are proud to share our recent feature on the Dering Hall platform.

We are grateful to be a featured professional this month with Dering Hall — check out our featured fixture!

Pre-Vintage Spanish Chandelier

Adg Lighting 90540 Spanish Chandelier 4 Lighting Ceiling Iron

From the ADG Jobsite

Lighting at a Malibu vineyard pool for a complete modern makeover!

Adg Custom Lighting

by Gerald Olesker, CEO, ADG Lighting

Venturi Architect 100

Robert Venturi, Pioneer of Post Modernism Passes at 93

“Don’t trust an architect who’s trying to start a movement.”

~ Robert Venturi

Robert Venturi, considered the father of postmodernism and an iconic architect, passed away this week at the age of 93. Declaring once that ‘Less is a bore,’ He gained acclaim from his 1966 book “Complexity and Contradiction in Architecture.” In his work, he overturned the theory of Mies van der Rohe’s famous dictum of ‘less is more.’  During his lauded career, he went from an architectural renegade to a master, winning the 1991 Pritzker Architecture Prize. He has brought architecture to where it is today by shaping a generation of architects. The last 20 years of architecture would be lost without the influential work of Venturi.

His first important work was the Vanna Venturi House in Philadelphia, which was designed for his mother and completed in the early 1960’s. The house can be recognized as a traditional house, but past that Venturi put his vision to work. He left the gable of the house open at the top, and the staircase wide at the bottom and narrow at the top. This gave you the strong impression that you were leaving the grandness of the open living area into the private living spaces above. He painted the exterior of the house a pale green, simply because he was told no one should paint a house green. This work was so significant that it was recognized on a postage stamp in 2005.

His reputation continued to grow after the acclaim of the Vanna Venturi House, as his views of architecture became more accepted in the mainstream. In the 1970’s, he designed the iconic Freedom Plaza in Washington, DC. He later designed buildings for Harvard, Yale and Princeton. Venturi was celebrated with his addition to the Oberlin College Art Museum in Ohio, the National Gallery in London, and the new Seattle Art Museum.

From the Factory Floor

6′ tall double pair of bar doors, in collaboration with Studio William Hefner

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by Gerald Olesker, CEO, ADG Lighting

pitigliano italy architecture

Pitigliano Rises Above the Tuscan Countryside

In the Grosseto province of Tuscany, a volcanic ridge rises high above the countryside. Perfectly situated above that ridge is the small town of Pitigliano, which holds some of Tuscany’s more fascinating architecture. The small town dates back to 1061, where it was first mentioned in historical data. In the early 13th century it became the property of a private family. It subsequently passed ownership between the government and other private families until 1562.

One of the most fascinating highlights of Pitigliano is the volcanic plateau it sits atop of. There are ‘cuts’ into the tufa rock which date back to the earliest history of the town. These cuts range in depth from three and a half feet down to a depth of over 10 feet. Some were used for water irrigation, but the majority were used as steps and walkways that create a small navigation network through the town. A few others have carve-outs that have served as shops or homes for the people of Pitigliano.

The architecture of Pitigliano is inspiring, some dating back to the 12th century. The Palazzo Orisini is a fortress that rises up above the city’s entrance. The fortress walls ensconce the city and the fortress itself is now a museum of art. The Chiesa di San Rocco is the oldest church in Pitigliano and dates back to the 12th century.  During a recent preservation and renovation of the church, ancient tombs were discovered and are leading historians on an adventure of the town’s ancestry. The Cathedral of Saints Peter and Paul were built during the Middle Ages and remodeled in baroque style in the late 16th century. You will also find a 16th century aqueduct that runs the length of the town. The Jewish synagogue is a ‘must see’ in this ancient city as it dates back to the 15th century. Jews first settled in Pitigliano in the 15th century, fleeing from the Papal State of the Catholic Church and thrived for centuries afterwards. As the community grew, the town became known as La Piccola Gerusalemme or Little Jerusalem.

From the ADG Jobsite 

It’s all about the leather. Thanks Rachael Goddard for the opportunity to have fun together!

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by Gerald Olesker, CEO, ADG Lighting

Spiral House 100

Spiral House in Phoenix For Sale

It is not often such an iconic structure comes on the market, as a serious offering to the public. Even more so, when that structure was designed by the iconic Frank Lloyd Wright, the potential sale becomes that more attention getting. To make things even more interesting, the home was designed specifically for his son and daughter-in-law, David and Gladys Wright.

The home is currently owned by Zach Rawling and was purchased for $2.4 million in 2012. His initial plan when purchasing the home was to run it into a museum, then donate it to the School of Architecture at Taliesin. However, this plan met with stiff opposition from the neighborhood due to traffic and publicity concerns adversely affecting the neighborhood. Now, the home is on the market for $12.95 million.

The Spiral House was labeled on the original plans by Frank Lloyd Wright as a model of how to live in the Southwest. His idea for the home was to perfectly harmonize the way a building relates to its environment. The round shape became a signature of his work in later years, including the Guggenheim Museum.

Located on 5.9 acres with a view of Camelback Mountain, the Spiral House is 2,553 square feet and was built in 1952. It currently has an application pending for historic preservation. The home features three bedrooms and four baths, with a cantilevered spiral walk-up access to the house. Inside, the home features the concrete block construction with elegant Philippine mahogany accents. The property includes a 360 square-foot guest house. The signature ‘March Balloons’ carpets and furnishings in the living area were custom designed by Wright.

David and Gladys Wright often referred to the Spiral House as their Taj Mahal, and understood the uniqueness of the building they called home.

From the ADG Factory

Water-jet cut bar doors, getting a gentle oil rubdown…

Adg Custom Fixture Jobsite

by Gerald Olesker, CEO. ADG Lighting