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MARS Case Offers Solutions For Colonizing the Red Planet

Space exploration and the planet Mars have been in the imagination of many for decades. The Red Planet has especially intrigued many, imagining the possibilities of settling another planet near Earth and the potential of little green men. As technology has advanced, space exploration became a true reality, as man slipped the bonds of Earth and headed out into the galaxy. No matter how far our machines have traveled into space, the Red Planet has remained the main fascination of scientists and adventurers. Today, Mars remains a top focus of Elon Musk and Space X. One day, we will settle Mars!

One of the first challenges encountered when exploring or settling Mars is, of course, providing livable structures that can be reasonably transported to the Red Planet and easily constructed. The Beijing-based design firm Open Architecture has partnered with the Chinese technology firm Xiaomi to design a structure to house our explorers on Mars. Out of that partnership, the MARS case has come to life. The innovative design represents the vision of an ideal hosting unit, combining technology with product design and innovative architecture.

The MARS case is a portable structure that is easily transferable to and from confined space transports. It is a living bubble, which is attached to a base, which can be inflated, collapsed and folded into itself, much like a suitcase. Inside is a main living area, a bathroom, a desk and chairs, along with a storage area. Smartphones will able to control lighting, appliances and other functions inside the house. There are even windows in the structure that pop out when it is inflated. The design is also capable of harnessing and recycling heat, exhaust, and condensation, which allows the minimal use of resources.

From the Factory Floor

Handmade art deco chain getting ready for Bel Air!

adg lighting, factory

by Gerald Olesker, CEO, ADG Lighting

 

 

 

Beverly Center 2

Beverly Center Shows off a New Image

The Beverly Center is showing off a new facelift and revitalization on November 1st. The mid-city landmark first opened in July 1982, and showed off a unique design presence for the area. The unusual shape of the mall was a result of its position at the intersection of a number of angled local streets and the salt lake oilfield.

The new look of the Beverly Center will improve and enhance the aesthetic qualities of the landmark, with moving surfaces that replace the original static facade. The new surface will feature wavelike movement, which reflects the surrounding urban landscape. This effect is achieved through the use of a vertical series of throbbing LEDs, which create the wavy effect. The combination of new surfaces and LEDs dematerializes the volume of light and color, decomposing them and altering the viewer’s perception of the building in both day and night.

Visitors will enter into large brightly lit open spaces surrounded by the three story design of the mall, featuring breathtaking skylights. The skylight allows the flow of natural light to expand into all areas of the mall, including the first level and commercial meeting spaces. From the pleasant promenade inside the building, a panoramic terrace on the mall’s roof strengthens the relationship between inside and out, and welcomes both visitors and occupants of the surrounding areas to use it.

Beverly Center has been an iconic building in mid-city, drawing locals and tourists to this shopping mecca for decades. Withe the newest renovation and facelift, the area will continue to enjoy the upscale shopping and meeting center for the area. It will continue to reflect the innovation and lifeblood of Los Angeles for many decades to come.

From the Factory Floor

Sneak peak of our cast bronze art deco chandelier!

IMG 9280

by Gerald Olesker, CEO, ADG Lighting

Midtown Center 100

Midtown Center in Washington DC

Midtown Center is located at the corner of L Street Northwest and 15th Street Northwest, on the site of the old Washington Post, which was razed in 2016. Three elevated walkways link two wings of the U-shaped, glass-faced office building. Midtown Center was designed by SHoP Architects, just four blocks from the White House in the heart of Washington DC.

This innovative addition to the DC landscape is a 14 story U-shaped building, encompassing 865,000 square feet and serves as the headquarters of Fannie Mae. Beyond meeting the needs of Fannie Mae, the aim of the Midtown Center project was to create a building that helps energize this part of the city. One of the most welcoming features is the open and expansive public plaza, with retail and dining enterprises that bring the space to life. The courtyard features intimate gathering areas, a sunken granite fountain, and angled pathways that connect with the surrounding neighborhood.

High above the public plaza are three angular sky bridges connecting the towers, which help to animate the public plaza below. The façades of the building are sheathed in glass, allowing natural light to penetrate the interior workspaces. The copper accents on the exterior pay homage to local design traditions in Washington DC. It will develop a patina over time and is used throughout, adding a deep texture to the skybridges.

In the planning of Midtown Center, SHoP Architects took their inspiration from the original master plan for Washington DC by Pierre Charles L’Enfant. They created a building that allows visitors to angle strategically across the site and engage with it in new ways.  

From the Factory Floor

Handmade art deco chain getting ready for Bel Air!

Adg Custom Lighting

by Gerald Olesker, CEO, ADG Lighting

 

 

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ADG Lighting Custom Fixture Featured On Dering Hall

ADG Lighting designs, fabricates and manufactures lighting fixtures, architectural ornamentation, and metal work in all styles. Our versatility can be seen in our wide range of work on a number of residential and commercial properties. The versatility of our work includes projects in transitional architecture, traditional architecture, contemporary architecture, historic architecture, and high-end architecture.

Dering Hall offers an entirely new approach to furnishing a home—and one that makes hunting for that perfect bespoke sideboard a dynamic and enjoyable experience. Our partnership is ideal, as we offer unique and creative design solutions for a discriminating clientele. We are proud to share our recent feature on the Dering Hall platform.

We are grateful to be a featured professional this month with Dering Hall — check out our featured fixture!

Pre-Vintage Spanish Chandelier

Adg Lighting 90540 Spanish Chandelier 4 Lighting Ceiling Iron

From the ADG Jobsite

Lighting at a Malibu vineyard pool for a complete modern makeover!

Adg Custom Lighting

by Gerald Olesker, CEO, ADG Lighting

colmar, france, architecture, adg

Colmar Architecture Dazzles Travelers off the Beaten Path

Colmar, France is a picturesque village in the northeastern part of France, along the Rhine River and the German Border. This historic region of France is known as the Alsace region and reminds visitors of being in Venice. Colmar features cobblestone streets running alongside the canals, which are surrounded by half-timbered medieval and early Renaissance buildings stacked above. The town dates back to 800 A.D. and has been ruled by Germany, Sweden, Italy and finally France. It is also the birthplace of Frederic Auguste Bartholdi, who is best known as the sculptor of the Statue of Liberty.

The main attraction to Colmar is the architecture. The Renaissance architecture of the region dates between the 14th and the 17th centuries in Europe. It demonstrates a conscious revival and development of elements of ancient Greek and Roman thought and material. It stylistically followed Gothic architecture, and was succeeded by the Baroque style of architecture. Renaissance architecture places style emphasis on symmetry, proportion and geometry.

Colmar features secular and religious architectural landmarks that reflect eight centuries of Germanic and French architecture and the adaptation of their respective stylistic language to the local customs and building materials, such as pink and yellow Vosges sandstone and timber frame. The picturesque city’s architecture remains amazingly intact and transports the traveler back to the earliest part of European history. The Old Town is a beautiful historic area and lies between the Rue des Têtes, the Rue des Clefs, and the Rue des Marchands near the Place de la Cathédrale. Admire the rebuilt Gothic church of Collégiale Saint-Martin. Visitors can see the Ancien Corps de Garde, which has been everything from a marketplace to a justice hall to a themed military housing district. One of the oldest buildings in Colmar, The Maison Adolph, was built in 1350 for the Adolph family.

A visit to Colmar will take you back to the earliest history of Europe. There are so many architectural attractions and features, one can get lost appreciating and exploring the grandeur for days.

From the ADG Jobsite  

Our ring pendant at a high rise in San Francisco, in collaboration with Triomphe Design

adg-custom-lighting

 by Gerald Olesker, CEO, ADG Lighting

 

yugoslavia, architecture, custom lighting

Yugoslavia and the Lost Art of Socialist Architecture

When the iron curtain descended on Eastern Europe after World War II, the citizens of Yugoslavia found themselves suffering from the aftermath of global combat and yearning for the promised comfort of socialism. Stalinism had taken hold and made promises of work, food and housing as a right of every citizen. What these new socialists didn’t understand was there was a huge gap between what their leaders felt as ‘quality’ services and what the people thought was quality. Those promises didn’t keep their citizens warm in Eastern Europe and there was a dire need for apartment buildings to properly shelter their comrades. Im most of the eastern bloc, architects and planners were told by the state how to design and what they should design. There was no room for creativity. It was all up to the vision of the state. This was not the case in Yugoslavia. 

Yugoslavia was led by Marshal Tito, who had a vision that greatly differed from other iron curtain leaders. Even though he was a brutal dictator and led with an iron fist,  he had a unique world vision and took advantage of realistic political opportunities. Yugoslavia was located between east and west, and had a multiethnic population with a multiplicity of architectural traditions.  This allowed Tito to allow local control and architectural ideas start flowing from the bottom, not the top. Architectural opportunities emerged out of Tito’s political opportunism.

Socialists Explore Architecture in Yugoslavia

Architects were able to take advantage of Tito’s socioeconomic policies and build structures that were significantly more creative, innovative and truly support the needs of the people of Yugoslavia. This greatly separated the creative design of Yugoslavia under socialism and the cookie-cutter designs of the remainder of the iron curtain.   

Check out the MoMA exhibit titled Toward a Concrete Utopia:
Architecture in Yugoslavia, 1948–1980
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