adg lighting - architectural detail group

Archives

Robert Winter Architecture

Robert Winter, The Godfather of LA Architecture Passes

“Robert Winter was in the last of a group who lived and breathed the built world of Los Angeles, the people who experienced the development of midcentury modern architecture before there was a term for it.”

Paddy Calistro, Publisher Angel City Press

Robert Winter, the most renowned Los Angeles architectural historian and the Arthur G. Coons Professor of the History of Ideas, Emeritus, at Occidental College, Los Angeles passed at the age of 94. His writings have shined a light on the region’s architectural treasures and helped define the city’s built environment. Lovingly known throughout the architectural industry as “Bungalow Bob,” he was particularly known for his contributions to the history of the California branch of the Arts and Crafts Movement. Winter was present at the creation of the Craftsman Revival in the early 1970s — a revival that, as he has famously noted, has gone on far longer than the relatively short-lived Craftsman period itself.

He was born in Indianapolis in 1924 and attended Dartmouth University and Johns Hopkins before accepting positions at UCLA and Occidental College, where he taught for more than three decades. Robert Winter was eagerly known for his architectural writing, authoring or co-authoring numerous publications over the years. His most recognized work was his collaboration with David Gebhard, titled An Architectural Guidebook to Los Angeles, which became a ‘must-own’ reference guide for architects and architectural enthusiasts since the first editions in 1965.

Robert Winter lived in The Batchelder House, which is a historic home built in 1910 and located in Pasadena. It is known as an important center of Pasadena cultural life and was designed and built by Ernest A. Batchelder, a prominent leader of the Arts and Crafts Movement.  The house is a large bungalow style home, with the woodsy design elements of a Swiss chalet.

From the ADG Jobsite

Install in progress at an auto museum in Ohio…

IMG 9819

by Gerald Olesker, CEO, ADG

 

usc-adg-custom-lighting

A USC Architectural ‘Whodunit’

Most folks love a good mystery! A twisting, turning plot that gets more complicated at every turn. Details become more blurred and facts become elusive in the best mystery. Now, the plot thickens around a story that involves USC, Samuel and Harriet Freeman and the work of Frank Lloyd Wright and Rudolph Schindler.

Samuel and Harriet Freeman commissioned Wright to design their home in the Hollywood Hills into an epic showplace for them. Wright did just that! He designed a breathtaking home and ringed the living room with tall windows that provided stunning views of Highland Avenue and the surrounding hills. Among the furnishings he designed for the home were six-foot tall iron lamps. Later, Schindler added his touches to the residence with his own unique furnishings. Samuel died in 1981 and Harriet passed in 1986. Their luxurious home and furnishings were left to the USC School of Architecture, trusting they would treasure the property as a site for meetings, classes and historic preservation.  Ah, the best-laid plans!

Over the years, USC School of Architecture quickly found out the true expense of maintaining and preserving this treasure and its contents. In 1994, the home was severely damaged in the Northridge Earthquake. It took over eight years to secure $1 million dollars from FEMA for the restoration work. In 2000, USC secured a warehouse with a large open space and one lockable storage room. The contents of the home were moved into storage and the lamps and sofa were locked into the smaller storage space. For 10 years, the contents sat in storage, sometimes glimpsed by USC faculty, staff and students. The plot thickens!

In 2012, USC staffers noticed the lamps and sofa missing. There was only one key in existence and no signs of forced entry or vandalism. Despite the obvious value of the items taken, no one at USC filed a report with campus police, LAPD or the university’s insurance carriers. Talk of the theft circulated among some at the architecture school, but few outsiders had any knowledge. Ultimately, someone with some intimate knowledge of the theft sent an anonymous email to the LA Times tipping them off. The Times worked with USC on the information and the school found enough validity in the information to finally formally report and investigate the crime. USC Police reported the incident to the LAPD in mid-January for investigation.

Now that the investigation is in the appropriate hands, this incident has created a great deal of concern for USC, the USC School of Architecture and the architecture community at large. The value of the missing items is considerable and classify this incident as a felony. It is the hope of most professionals that the items are recovered and returned to a restored property that pays respect to Samuel and Harriet Freeman, along with Wright and Schindler. The question remains — Whodunit?

From the ADG Factory Floor

 Customized LED color change lens installed into ring pendant…

Adg Lighting Factory 

by Gerald Olesker, CEO, ADG Lighting

 

sustainable architecture, adg

Sustainable Architecture Sets the Standard

Sustainable architecture is now at the forefront of design for the future. Scientific studies have proven time and time again that global warming is a real threat to the health of our planet. As we move forward as a global society, we must consider the effects of sustainability in every aspect of our lives. The U.S. Energy Information Administration reports that close to 50% of all CO2 emissions come from our buildings. It creates a sense of urgency in the architectural community to embrace sustainable architecture.

Since the late 60s and early 70s, the concept of sustainable architecture has gradually taken hold in the architecture community. In recent years, it has become standard practice in many countries, but many others continue to ignore the value or impact of the practice.

The idea behind the practice is to use only environmentally friendly techniques and materials during the building process. It also seeks to minimize the negative impact of buildings through efficient energy consumption and development space. Architects who practice sustainable architecture look to renewable resources such as harvested wood, concrete, and rock, along with recycled materials like glass and lumber. They also look to reuse architectural components of other buildings, including doors, windows, and flooring. Setting aside materials, sustainable architecture also focuses on how efficiently energy will be used and how to effectively conserve. Thoughtfully designed buildings also rely on solar energy or other alternative energy sources.

Sustainable architecture provides not only an eco-friendly alternative to traditional construction techniques but also added energy efficiency and superior style. There’s no doubt that sustainable architecture is the way of the future. With the known impact of global warming, willfully ignoring the impact of our architectural practices could have a catastrophic impact on our society. Sound practices exist for sustainable architecture and more countries need to embrace these concepts and make them the standard, not the option.

From the ADG Job Site

 Custom made order for a client out of San Francisco

custom-lighting-adg

by Gerald Olesker, CEO, ADG Lighting

palm-springs-architecture

Palm Springs Modernism Week Is Upon Us

Mark your calendars and start channeling your best ‘Rat Pack’ persona! It is time to make your way into the desert and visit Palm Springs in all its splendor. Palm Springs Modernism Week is scheduled for Feb 14-24, 2019, and this annual event will be bigger than ever.

The goal of this retro adventure in the desert is to foster an appreciation of midcentury modern architecture, design and contemporary innovation. Modernism Week is a registered non-profit organization which encourages the preservation, education, and sustainability of modern living as represented in the Palm Springs area. Some of Palm Springs’ most notable private homes will open their doors to the public, and walking tours will shed light on the city’s Rat Pack history. More than 350 other events in this event will engage and entertain visitors.

Moshe Safdie, CC, FAIA will give the keynote address, and it is not to be missed. He is an Israeli-Canadian architect, urban designer, educator, and theorist. His humanistic philosophy on architecture and urbanism focuses on the design of the public realm and creating buildings that celebrate the unique character of each place. He continues to innovate with groundbreaking projects, such as the Marina Bay Sands Integrated Resort in Singapore’s waterfront district, which includes three 55-story towers connected across their rooftops by a three-acre mixed-use SkyPark.

Along with the house tour and the featured Christopher Kennedy Compound open house,  there will be a vintage trailer show. The show will celebrate the vintage trailer lifestyle and inspire those who dream of channeling their inner wanderlust. There will also be films, lectures, premier double-decker architectural bus tours, nightly parties, and live music, along with walking and bike tours, fashion, classic cars, and modern garden tours.

Palm Springs Modernism Week is an absolute must-do for anyone who is excited by all things midcentury modern. Take a walk back in time, channel your best Rat Pack persona, and plan on attending.

From the Factory Floor

Copper wrap light fixtures for Shaquille O’Neal’s new Downtown LA eatery!

adg-custom-lighting

by Gerald Olesker, CEO, ADG Lighting

Cte Stem Architecture

CTE Designates Architecture a STEM Subject

After decades of work, the discipline of architecture has been officially recognized as a STEM subject. Congress passed the STEM legislation designation and the bipartisan bill was sign into law by the  President. The American Institute of Architects (AIA) has long lobbied for the Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education (CTE) Act.

The CTE is intended to encourage a more diverse workforce and see that the promise of design as the synthesis of art and science are fulfilled through education. While architects and AIA components have been working to bring design to K-12 students through special programs and activities for years, this bill helps codify those efforts. Importantly, it exposes a new generation of students, and better prepares them for, a career in architecture.

~American Institute of Architects

STEM is an education curriculum that focuses heavily on the subjects of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. It is a growing movement in education around the world. STEM-based learning programs encourage and promote student interest in pursuing higher education and careers in those fields. STEM education typically uses a newer model of blended learning. It combines traditional classroom teaching with online learning and hands-on learning methodologies. Blended learning aims to give students the opportunity to experience different ways of learning and problem-solving. Recent studies show the U.S. ranks 38th out of 71 countries in math and 24th in science. Among the 35 members of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, the U.S. ranked 30th in math and 19th in science.

Education in STEM curriculum is crucial to the future of our children and the strength of the U.S. on a global scale. The work of the AIA on the CTE is a strong step towards a stronger future for students.  The CTE will open up more than a billion dollars in career and education grants to the states. It will modernize architecture programs, which have traditionally suffered in most education systems.

From the ADG Job Site

One of four walnut and metalized hanging progressive helix sculptures at the San Manuel Casino!

IMG 9648

by Gerald Olesker, CEO, ADG Lighting

Richard Rogers Architect

Richard Rogers Wins AIA Gold

Richard Rogers wins the 2019 AIA Gold Medal, and will be recognized at this year’s national conference in Las Vegas. Rogers is a Pritzker Prize-winning architect recognized for his work on the Centre Pompidou and the Lloyd’s of London headquarters. Rogers is recognized as one of the leading architects of the British high-tech movement. He stands out as one of the most innovative and distinctive architects of a generation.

After attending the Architectural Association in London, Rogers studied at Yale University, where he met architecture student Norman Foster. After graduating Yale, the two architects joined forces with Su Brumwell and Wendy Cheeseman to form Team 4 in 1963. Though their collaboration as Team 4 lasted just four years, it would prove to be a crucial formative stage in British architecture, as both Rogers and Foster went on to be the leading names of the British high-tech scene.

Rogers began another fruitful collaboration after Team 4; this time with Renzo Piano, whose big break came in 1971 when, working with architect Gianfranco Franchini and Peter Rice, an engineer from Arup, won the competition to design the Centre Pompidou. Rogers and Piano shocked many with their radical design, placing the building’s services in full view in a trademark technique that went on to be known as “bowellism.” He considers the work his team delivered through the Urban Task Force to be among his most significant achievements. The initiative brought together a range of people who were concerned with the physical environment, from academics, planners and politicians to developers and architects.

Since 1947, the American Institute of Architects (AIA) had awarded the AIA Gold Medal, which is conferred by the AIA Board of Directors. It is awarded to those architects for a significant body of work with influence on the theory and practice of architecture.

From the Factory Floor

New doors for the bar!

adg-custom-work

 

by Gerald Olesker, CEO, ADG Lighting