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New Delhi Architecture 100

New Delhi Will Feature Smog Towers to Reduce Smog

New Delhi citizens are facing a smog crisis of epic proportions. The World Health Organization has classified Indian cities in the top 20 of the most polluted in the world. In 2017, the air quality in New Delhi was so poor that it was the equivalent of smoking 44 cigarettes a day. The health implications of this crisis are profound.

The Smog Project encompasses a series of 328 feet-high filtration pods, each capable of producing 353 million cubic feet of clean air per day, and is the brainchild of architect Najmus Chowdhry. He has said that the air quality in New Delhi is comparable to a gas chamber, and that everyone in positions of authority are passing the buck.

Chowdhry’s design sucks air in through the base of each tower structure and it passes through five stages of filtration. As the air flows through the tower, it is filtered through charcoal activated carbon, negative ion generators, and electrostatically charged plasma and photo-catalyst elements. These filters will trap airborne particles, bacteria and viruses. The towers would be powered by solar hydrogen cells, laid out in a hexagonal network of sky bridges between towers. The repository of carbon particles will be recycled into the production of graphene, concrete, fertilizer, ink, and the water distillation process.

Curbing practices that cause smog in the New Delhi area is a slow process that could take generations if something drastic is not done. Biomass burning, industry and transport emissions are the chief contributors to the smog crisis. It is estimated that it will increase by 775% in 2040, while public transportation is in a sharp decline. It is truly the perfect storm.

The Smog Project is shortlisted for a World Architecture Festival 2018 award in the  ‘Experimental Future Project’ category, for proposals that challenge conventional thinking.

From the ADG Jobsite  

Patina on steel custom joints, on a project with architect Eric Meyorwitz

Adg Custom Lighting         

by Gerald Olesker, CEO, ADG Lighting

pitigliano italy architecture

Pitigliano Rises Above the Tuscan Countryside

In the Grosseto province of Tuscany, a volcanic ridge rises high above the countryside. Perfectly situated above that ridge is the small town of Pitigliano, which holds some of Tuscany’s more fascinating architecture. The small town dates back to 1061, where it was first mentioned in historical data. In the early 13th century it became the property of a private family. It subsequently passed ownership between the government and other private families until 1562.

One of the most fascinating highlights of Pitigliano is the volcanic plateau it sits atop of. There are ‘cuts’ into the tufa rock which date back to the earliest history of the town. These cuts range in depth from three and a half feet down to a depth of over 10 feet. Some were used for water irrigation, but the majority were used as steps and walkways that create a small navigation network through the town. A few others have carve-outs that have served as shops or homes for the people of Pitigliano.

The architecture of Pitigliano is inspiring, some dating back to the 12th century. The Palazzo Orisini is a fortress that rises up above the city’s entrance. The fortress walls ensconce the city and the fortress itself is now a museum of art. The Chiesa di San Rocco is the oldest church in Pitigliano and dates back to the 12th century.  During a recent preservation and renovation of the church, ancient tombs were discovered and are leading historians on an adventure of the town’s ancestry. The Cathedral of Saints Peter and Paul were built during the Middle Ages and remodeled in baroque style in the late 16th century. You will also find a 16th century aqueduct that runs the length of the town. The Jewish synagogue is a ‘must see’ in this ancient city as it dates back to the 15th century. Jews first settled in Pitigliano in the 15th century, fleeing from the Papal State of the Catholic Church and thrived for centuries afterwards. As the community grew, the town became known as La Piccola Gerusalemme or Little Jerusalem.

From the ADG Jobsite 

It’s all about the leather. Thanks Rachael Goddard for the opportunity to have fun together!

Adg Featured Fixture Custom

by Gerald Olesker, CEO, ADG Lighting

colmar, france, architecture, adg

Colmar Architecture Dazzles Travelers off the Beaten Path

Colmar, France is a picturesque village in the northeastern part of France, along the Rhine River and the German Border. This historic region of France is known as the Alsace region and reminds visitors of being in Venice. Colmar features cobblestone streets running alongside the canals, which are surrounded by half-timbered medieval and early Renaissance buildings stacked above. The town dates back to 800 A.D. and has been ruled by Germany, Sweden, Italy and finally France. It is also the birthplace of Frederic Auguste Bartholdi, who is best known as the sculptor of the Statue of Liberty.

The main attraction to Colmar is the architecture. The Renaissance architecture of the region dates between the 14th and the 17th centuries in Europe. It demonstrates a conscious revival and development of elements of ancient Greek and Roman thought and material. It stylistically followed Gothic architecture, and was succeeded by the Baroque style of architecture. Renaissance architecture places style emphasis on symmetry, proportion and geometry.

Colmar features secular and religious architectural landmarks that reflect eight centuries of Germanic and French architecture and the adaptation of their respective stylistic language to the local customs and building materials, such as pink and yellow Vosges sandstone and timber frame. The picturesque city’s architecture remains amazingly intact and transports the traveler back to the earliest part of European history. The Old Town is a beautiful historic area and lies between the Rue des Têtes, the Rue des Clefs, and the Rue des Marchands near the Place de la Cathédrale. Admire the rebuilt Gothic church of Collégiale Saint-Martin. Visitors can see the Ancien Corps de Garde, which has been everything from a marketplace to a justice hall to a themed military housing district. One of the oldest buildings in Colmar, The Maison Adolph, was built in 1350 for the Adolph family.

A visit to Colmar will take you back to the earliest history of Europe. There are so many architectural attractions and features, one can get lost appreciating and exploring the grandeur for days.

From the ADG Jobsite  

Our ring pendant at a high rise in San Francisco, in collaboration with Triomphe Design

adg-custom-lighting

 by Gerald Olesker, CEO, ADG Lighting

 

bad kissingen, architecture

Bad Kissingen is a Retreat for Aristocracy

Travel is Europe has never been more exciting than now, thanks to the openness of the European Union and the promotion on social media. Most everyone is familiar with the most high-profile attractions of Europe, such as Big Ben, the Eiffel Tower and the Colosseum in Rome. Because of the influence of digital media and social sharing, the most amazing locations in Europe have been opened up to the world. These sights and locations have only been notable to local tourism or the fortunate few who have been able to spend extended  amounts of time on the continent. Now, the hidden wonders of Europe are being opened up to the world, and anyone can plan a trip to previously obscure locations for a monumental experience, avoiding the largest of the tourist traps.

One of these special locations is Bad Kissingen, Germany. For centuries, the Germans have believed in the curing treatments found in localities across the country, thus the town would be designated a ‘Bad’ or ‘cure spa’, thus the name of Bad Kissingen. The town is located in the Bavarian region of Lower Franconia on the Saale river. The town traces its roots back to the year 831 A.D. It was developed into a spa in the 1500’s. Because of the special geographic location and sheer beauty of the region, the Kings of Bavaria and renowned architects created a magnificent city on the Saale. It quickly became the favorite location for the nobility and aristocracy of Europe. Prince Otto von Bismark spent a great deal of time in Bad Kissingen, conducting affairs of state and entertaining royalty, along with taking in the ‘cures’ the town became famous for.

Bad Kissingen is know for the grand splendor of the architecture. From the Regentenbau and Arkadenbau buildings, to the Wandelhalle complex and Casino Lutpold, visitors are immediately inspired by these impressive buildings. These magnificent structures are surrounded by three expansive formal gardens and parks. Luitpoldpark was inspired by English landscape gardens, the Kurgarten incorporates many baroque elements, and the Rose Garden is arranged in impressive geometric shapes. The entire complex of parks, gardens and buildings nestle up to the slow moving Saale river which wanders through the town. This makes for a breathtaking tourist experience once reserved exclusively for the nobility and aristocracy of Europe.

Travel On!

From the ADG Jobsite

Hotel fun and construction in San Luis Obispo with Carrie!

Adg Slo Hotel Architecture Lighting

by Gerald Olesker, CEO, ADG Lighting

yugoslavia, architecture, custom lighting

Yugoslavia and the Lost Art of Socialist Architecture

When the iron curtain descended on Eastern Europe after World War II, the citizens of Yugoslavia found themselves suffering from the aftermath of global combat and yearning for the promised comfort of socialism. Stalinism had taken hold and made promises of work, food and housing as a right of every citizen. What these new socialists didn’t understand was there was a huge gap between what their leaders felt as ‘quality’ services and what the people thought was quality. Those promises didn’t keep their citizens warm in Eastern Europe and there was a dire need for apartment buildings to properly shelter their comrades. Im most of the eastern bloc, architects and planners were told by the state how to design and what they should design. There was no room for creativity. It was all up to the vision of the state. This was not the case in Yugoslavia. 

Yugoslavia was led by Marshal Tito, who had a vision that greatly differed from other iron curtain leaders. Even though he was a brutal dictator and led with an iron fist,  he had a unique world vision and took advantage of realistic political opportunities. Yugoslavia was located between east and west, and had a multiethnic population with a multiplicity of architectural traditions.  This allowed Tito to allow local control and architectural ideas start flowing from the bottom, not the top. Architectural opportunities emerged out of Tito’s political opportunism.

Socialists Explore Architecture in Yugoslavia

Architects were able to take advantage of Tito’s socioeconomic policies and build structures that were significantly more creative, innovative and truly support the needs of the people of Yugoslavia. This greatly separated the creative design of Yugoslavia under socialism and the cookie-cutter designs of the remainder of the iron curtain.   

Check out the MoMA exhibit titled Toward a Concrete Utopia:
Architecture in Yugoslavia, 1948–1980
.


Hot off the Press

Check out our latest feature in the LA Times!

world architecture festival

World Architecture Festival 2018 in Amsterdam

The World Architecture Festival was first held in 2008. It is a three day festival and awards competition dedicated to celebrating architecture from across the globe. During the first four years, the festival was held in Barcelona, and since 2012 in Singapore. Each year, hundreds of projects are entered in the competition for the awards and more than 200 of these are shortlisted for live presentation at the festival. All the presentations of the entries are collected in the World Buildings Directory. The architects pay a submission fee to enter a project for a WAF Award and travel to where the festival is arranged to present the project live if it is shortlisted. The entries are voluntary and the festival does not control who submits projects.  

This year, the festival will be held in Amsterdam on Nov 28-30. The shortlist for their 2018 awards features 536 projects ranging from small family homes, to schools, stations, museums, large infrastructure and landscape projects. Known as the world’s largest architectural award program, the WAF Awards saw more participation this year than ever before, with more than 1000 entries received from projects located in 81 countries across the world. 

The 2018 World Architecture Festival Super Jury

Christopher Brandon, Managing Principal, Perkins & Will

Nigel Coates, Director, Nigel Coates Firm

Päivi Meuronen, Interior architect, JKMM Architects

Lyndon Neri, Founding Partner, Neri & Hu Design

Nesna Petresin, Visiting Fellow at Goldsmiths, University of London

From the ADG Jobsite

Custom square acrylic chandelier and pyrex and brass outdoor lights

by Gerald Olesker, CEO, ADG Lighting