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Category Archives: Pritzker Architecture Prize

Arata Isozaki Architect Pritzker

Arata Isozaki Awarded the 2019 Pritzker

“I wanted to see the world through my own eyes, so I traveled around the globe at least ten times before I turned 30. Through this, I kept questioning, ‘What is architecture?’”

Arata Isozaki

The 2019 Pritzker Prize has been awarded to Japanese architect Arata Isozaki. The Pritzker jury noted in their award that in over six decades of work, he has taken inspiration in shaping the physical from the intangible and promoted dialogue between Eastern and Western cultures, not through mimicry or a collage, but through forging new paths.

Arata Isozaki was born in 1931 in Kyushu, Japan, just across the waters from Hiroshima. At the age of 12, he saw his homeland burned down by the A-bomb attack on Hiroshima. It was a complete ruined wasteland. His city was left devoid of structures, architecture or cultural elements. This devastating event left young Isozaki considering how to rebuild cities from ground zero. This created a preoccupation with newly imagined concepts of urbanism that thread through his work today. He went on to study architecture at the University of Tokyo, graduating in 1954 and apprenticed under Kenzo Tange, the 1987 Pritzker award winner. Isozaki traveled the world extensively before the age of 30, getting a better understanding of people and their cultures, all the while wondering what is architecture.

Isozaki founded the firm Arata Isozaki & Associates in 1963 after the Allied Occupation of Japan ended, and was at the forefront of his country’s rebuilding effort. His work expanded to a global scale in 1980 and demonstrated an artful commingling of Japanese, European and American design elements through his work. His first commision (1981-1986) was the Museum of Contemporary Art, in Los Angeles. It was considered a controversial design for a postmodern building, rendered in red Indian sandstone. Isozaki was one of the first Japanese architects to build outside of Japan during a time when typically, Western culture was influencing the East. His work is truly international and influenced by his sense of global citizenry.

From the ADG Job Site

Having fun with full scale shop drawings in the rain. Architectural by Courtney Shatuck, interiors by Trip H.

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by Gerald Olesker, CEO, ADG Lighting

New Year 2019 100

The Best of ADG for 2018

 

New year — a new chapter, new verse, or just the same old story? Ultimately we write it. The choice is ours.

~Alex Morritt

We want to take this opportunity to review some of the Best of ADG for 2018. Every end marks a new beginning. Keep your spirits and determination unshaken, and you will always walk the glory road. With courage, faith and great effort, you shall achieve everything you desire. We wish you a Happy New Year!

~ The ADG Team

The Best of ADG 2018

Paul Williams Shaped the Face of Los Angeles Architecture

Paulwilliams Architect Historical

The Broadway District Rises Again

Broadway District Los Angeles

 

 

 

 


Pritzker Architecture Prize Committee Now Led By Supreme Court Justice

Stephen Breyer


The Noted Passing of Gene Leedy

Leedy Architect


Richard Rogers Architect

Richard Rogers Wins AIA Gold

Richard Rogers wins the 2019 AIA Gold Medal, and will be recognized at this year’s national conference in Las Vegas. Rogers is a Pritzker Prize-winning architect recognized for his work on the Centre Pompidou and the Lloyd’s of London headquarters. Rogers is recognized as one of the leading architects of the British high-tech movement. He stands out as one of the most innovative and distinctive architects of a generation.

After attending the Architectural Association in London, Rogers studied at Yale University, where he met architecture student Norman Foster. After graduating Yale, the two architects joined forces with Su Brumwell and Wendy Cheeseman to form Team 4 in 1963. Though their collaboration as Team 4 lasted just four years, it would prove to be a crucial formative stage in British architecture, as both Rogers and Foster went on to be the leading names of the British high-tech scene.

Rogers began another fruitful collaboration after Team 4; this time with Renzo Piano, whose big break came in 1971 when, working with architect Gianfranco Franchini and Peter Rice, an engineer from Arup, won the competition to design the Centre Pompidou. Rogers and Piano shocked many with their radical design, placing the building’s services in full view in a trademark technique that went on to be known as “bowellism.” He considers the work his team delivered through the Urban Task Force to be among his most significant achievements. The initiative brought together a range of people who were concerned with the physical environment, from academics, planners and politicians to developers and architects.

Since 1947, the American Institute of Architects (AIA) had awarded the AIA Gold Medal, which is conferred by the AIA Board of Directors. It is awarded to those architects for a significant body of work with influence on the theory and practice of architecture.

From the Factory Floor

New doors for the bar!

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by Gerald Olesker, CEO, ADG Lighting

 

Venturi Architect 100

Robert Venturi, Pioneer of Post Modernism Passes at 93

“Don’t trust an architect who’s trying to start a movement.”

~ Robert Venturi

Robert Venturi, considered the father of postmodernism and an iconic architect, passed away this week at the age of 93. Declaring once that ‘Less is a bore,’ He gained acclaim from his 1966 book “Complexity and Contradiction in Architecture.” In his work, he overturned the theory of Mies van der Rohe’s famous dictum of ‘less is more.’  During his lauded career, he went from an architectural renegade to a master, winning the 1991 Pritzker Architecture Prize. He has brought architecture to where it is today by shaping a generation of architects. The last 20 years of architecture would be lost without the influential work of Venturi.

His first important work was the Vanna Venturi House in Philadelphia, which was designed for his mother and completed in the early 1960’s. The house can be recognized as a traditional house, but past that Venturi put his vision to work. He left the gable of the house open at the top, and the staircase wide at the bottom and narrow at the top. This gave you the strong impression that you were leaving the grandness of the open living area into the private living spaces above. He painted the exterior of the house a pale green, simply because he was told no one should paint a house green. This work was so significant that it was recognized on a postage stamp in 2005.

His reputation continued to grow after the acclaim of the Vanna Venturi House, as his views of architecture became more accepted in the mainstream. In the 1970’s, he designed the iconic Freedom Plaza in Washington, DC. He later designed buildings for Harvard, Yale and Princeton. Venturi was celebrated with his addition to the Oberlin College Art Museum in Ohio, the National Gallery in London, and the new Seattle Art Museum.

From the Factory Floor

6′ tall double pair of bar doors, in collaboration with Studio William Hefner

Adg Custom Fixture Lighting Project

by Gerald Olesker, CEO, ADG Lighting

pritzker architecture prize, Stephen Breyer

Pritzker Architecture Prize Committee Now Led By Supreme Court Justice

Supreme Court Justice Stephen Breyer has been named as the chairman of the prestigious Pritzker Architecture Prize committee by the family that sponsors the prize. He will head a seven member jury of experts from around the globe. Tom Pritzker, executive chairman of the Chicago-based Hyatt Hotels Corp, stated:

“His devotion to civic-minded architecture underscores the mission of the prize and his unparalleled ability to guide a group deliberation is essential in creating a unified voice within this diverse and internal panel of jurors.”

The Pritzker Architecture Prize is awarded annually to honor a living architect or those architects who have distinguished themselves through work that displays commitment, talent and vision in architecture. The award was founded in 1979 by Jay and Cindy Pritzker and is funded by the Pritzker family, with the Hyatt Foundation serving as a corporate sponsor. It is most often referred to as the Nobel Prize of Architecture and has a steadfast reputation for recognizing architects irrespective of race, nationality or ideology. Some of the most notable architects who have received the coveted award include Frank Gehry and I.M. Pei.

Supreme Court Justice Stephen Breyer was born in San Francisco in 1938 and attended Harvard Law School, where he joined the Harvard Law Review and graduated magna cum laude in 1964. He went on to teach as Harvard Law for over two decades. He subsequently served as an assistant prosecutor during the Watergate hearings and was sworn in to the Supreme Court by President Bill Clinton in 1994. Justice Breyer has never studied architecture, but has a long-standing devotion and interest in the field. In 1999, he was one of  the two judges who served as advisors to the architects of the federal courthouse in Boston which opened in 1999. He has been a distinguished member of the Pritzker Architecture Prize jury since 2011.

From the ADG Jobsite

A collaboration with M. Elle Design

 adg lighting m elle designs

by Gerald Olesker, CEO, ADG Lighting