adg lighting - architectural detail group

Category Archives: Post Modern Architecture

pei-architect-modernism

Great Modernist Architect I.M. Pei Passed At 102

To describe modernist architect I.M. Pei as a progressive visionary is an understatement. Although initially opposed, his modernist designs are now some of the most revered in the world. It was as though I.M. Pei himself is responsible for designing the future. The glass pyramid in the Louvre Museum courtyard is a shining example of his genius.

Ieoh Ming Pei was born in Guangzhou, China in 1917. At age 18, he moved to the United States to study at the University of Pennsylvania, Harvard University, and MIT. While at the Harvard Graduate School of Design, Pei met and studied with German architect Walter Groplus, who was the founder of the Bauhaus design movement. Their mantra was known as form follows function; you could say it was the beginning of the modern architecture era. In 1955, Pei started his own architectural firm that he named I.M. Pei and Associates.

Change is difficult, and when he was chosen for the Louvre project by the president of France Francois Mitterrand as a gesture to leave his mark on Paris, unfortunately it wasn’t to the delight of the French people. Eventually the French grew to love this glass structure that was completed in 1989, and is now considered to be one of Paris’s most famous landmarks.

His works of modern architecture are located all over the world. They include the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum in Cleveland, Ohio; the National Center for Atmospheric Research in Boulder, Colorado; the East Building of the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C.; and the Museum of Islamic Art in Doha, Qatar, just to name a few. Pei’s list of accomplishments is a long one.

Pei drew inspiration from all different cultures, and liked to think of himself as one whose role was to create a bridge between past and present. Perhaps standing at that bridge gave him the ability to be a visionary; he was able to see the future and that is what he left behind for us to enjoy.

From the Job Site

It’s always exciting when your client sends you photos and says they love what you did…

add-lighting-custom-jobsite

by Gerald Olesker, CEO, ADG Lighting

World Architecture Festival Judges

World Architecture Festival Announces Judges for 2019 Awards

The World Architectural Festival (WAF) has announced the judges for the 2019 awards.  The festival is one of the most significant events in the architecture industry. 

The event is held on an annual basis. The judges review a shortlist of 200 projects, which compete for 31 awards in various categories. From those 200 shortlisted projects, the World Building of the Year will be awarded based on the judges’ interviews and evaluations. 

The World Architecture Festival was first held in 2008 and hosted in Barcelona for four years. The host city then was awarded to Singapore for four years. Since 2016, the host city has rotated between Berlin and Amsterdam. All the entries are published in the World Buildings Directory online database, and each year the World Architecture Festival publishes a list of the winners of the awards.

“This was a real eye opener and a brilliant event in that everything happening around the world is brought to a single event. I was really impressed with the topics and speakers especially on how architecture sees the future of the world and the global issues that are being addressed.”

~Gansen Govender, Senior Project Manager, GHD

The 2019 World Architecture Festival Judges

Shirley Blumberg – Partner , KPMB Architects

Lesley Lokko – Head of Graduate School of Architecture , University of Johannesburg 

Peter Cook

Tom de Paor

Yui Tezuka 

Complete Panel of Judges Here

From the Factory Floor

 Oil rubbed bronze fountains heading to a home in Malibu. Designers and architects know that we have a skill set that gives them the advantage! 

 adg factory custom lighting

by Gerald Olesker, CEO, ADG Lighting

Arata Isozaki Architect Pritzker

Arata Isozaki Awarded the 2019 Pritzker

“I wanted to see the world through my own eyes, so I traveled around the globe at least ten times before I turned 30. Through this, I kept questioning, ‘What is architecture?’”

Arata Isozaki

The 2019 Pritzker Prize has been awarded to Japanese architect Arata Isozaki. The Pritzker jury noted in their award that in over six decades of work, he has taken inspiration in shaping the physical from the intangible and promoted dialogue between Eastern and Western cultures, not through mimicry or a collage, but through forging new paths.

Arata Isozaki was born in 1931 in Kyushu, Japan, just across the waters from Hiroshima. At the age of 12, he saw his homeland burned down by the A-bomb attack on Hiroshima. It was a complete ruined wasteland. His city was left devoid of structures, architecture or cultural elements. This devastating event left young Isozaki considering how to rebuild cities from ground zero. This created a preoccupation with newly imagined concepts of urbanism that thread through his work today. He went on to study architecture at the University of Tokyo, graduating in 1954 and apprenticed under Kenzo Tange, the 1987 Pritzker award winner. Isozaki traveled the world extensively before the age of 30, getting a better understanding of people and their cultures, all the while wondering what is architecture.

Isozaki founded the firm Arata Isozaki & Associates in 1963 after the Allied Occupation of Japan ended, and was at the forefront of his country’s rebuilding effort. His work expanded to a global scale in 1980 and demonstrated an artful commingling of Japanese, European and American design elements through his work. His first commision (1981-1986) was the Museum of Contemporary Art, in Los Angeles. It was considered a controversial design for a postmodern building, rendered in red Indian sandstone. Isozaki was one of the first Japanese architects to build outside of Japan during a time when typically, Western culture was influencing the East. His work is truly international and influenced by his sense of global citizenry.

From the ADG Job Site

Having fun with full scale shop drawings in the rain. Architectural by Courtney Shatuck, interiors by Trip H.

add-custom-lighting-jobsite

by Gerald Olesker, CEO, ADG Lighting

Leedy Architect

The Noted Passing of Gene Leedy

Gene Leedy was known as the father of the Sarasota School of Architecture, and a fellow of the American Institute of Architects. This renowned architect passed this week at the age of 90. Leedy was born in Isaban, West Virginia. His parents subsequently moved the family to Gainesville, Florida, where they opened a small family restaurant. After high school, Leedy entered the University of Florida, where he studied architecture. He married his wife Kathryn Home and settled down in the town of Winter Haven, Florida, where he opened an architectural firm. In 1954, he was commissioned to build his first recognized work, the ‘Sparrow House.’

His design philosophy resulted in a phenomenon of modern architecture, a unique collection created during a period of over fifty years. Leedy produced innovative work with pre-stressed concrete, which led to his creation of double T beams. These techniques have left an enduring legacy and impacted both the past and future of architecture.

The work of Leedy has been recognized with countless awards and accolades. His steadfast conviction to this modern design philosophy resulted in his work being recognized on a global scale. The work of Leedy continues to transform the face of the architectural community and the spaces beyond.

Notable Commercial Work

Cypress Gardens Bank, Winter Haven, Florida, 1965

City Hall, Winter Haven, Florida, 1960

Keiltronix Office Building, Charlotte, North Carolina, 1987

Taxdal Medical Center, Winter Haven, Florida, 1986

Flagship Bank, Orlando, Florida, 1975

Chamber of Commerce, Winter Haven, Florida, 1990

Walden Lake Country Club, Plant City, Florida 1985

Commerce Bank of Central Florida, Winter Haven, Florida 1990

American National Bank, Winter Haven, Florida, 1962

Brentwood Elementary School, Sarasota, Florida, 1958

First National Bank of Cape Canaveral, Cape Canaveral, FL 1963

Notable Residential Work

House for Contemporary Builders, Sarasota, Florida, 1950

Craney Homes, Inc, Winter Haven, Florida, 1956

Weaving/Thomasson house, Winter Haven, Florida, 1956

Navickas Residence, Winter Haven, Florida, 1957

Dormon Residence, Winter Haven, Florida, 1963

Libby Residence, Winter Park, Florida, 1957

Sands Residence, Winter Haven, Florida, 1965

Sparrow Residence, Winter Haven, Florida, 1954

Brogden Residence, Winter Haven, Florida, 1979

Miller Residence, Plant City, Florida, 1985

Carlton Beach House, Boca Grande, Florida, 1985

Lifsey President’s House, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida 1994

Smith Beach House, Boca Grande, Florida, 1985

Solomon Residence & Studio, Siesta Key, Florida, 1970

Strang Residence, Winter Haven, Florida, 1970

Strasberg Residence, Longwood, Florida, 1982

From the ADG Jobsite

Custom pendant at Newport Coast property!

 adg jobsite architecture

by Gerald Olesker, CEO, ADG Lighting

Venturi Architect 100

Robert Venturi, Pioneer of Post Modernism Passes at 93

“Don’t trust an architect who’s trying to start a movement.”

~ Robert Venturi

Robert Venturi, considered the father of postmodernism and an iconic architect, passed away this week at the age of 93. Declaring once that ‘Less is a bore,’ He gained acclaim from his 1966 book “Complexity and Contradiction in Architecture.” In his work, he overturned the theory of Mies van der Rohe’s famous dictum of ‘less is more.’  During his lauded career, he went from an architectural renegade to a master, winning the 1991 Pritzker Architecture Prize. He has brought architecture to where it is today by shaping a generation of architects. The last 20 years of architecture would be lost without the influential work of Venturi.

His first important work was the Vanna Venturi House in Philadelphia, which was designed for his mother and completed in the early 1960’s. The house can be recognized as a traditional house, but past that Venturi put his vision to work. He left the gable of the house open at the top, and the staircase wide at the bottom and narrow at the top. This gave you the strong impression that you were leaving the grandness of the open living area into the private living spaces above. He painted the exterior of the house a pale green, simply because he was told no one should paint a house green. This work was so significant that it was recognized on a postage stamp in 2005.

His reputation continued to grow after the acclaim of the Vanna Venturi House, as his views of architecture became more accepted in the mainstream. In the 1970’s, he designed the iconic Freedom Plaza in Washington, DC. He later designed buildings for Harvard, Yale and Princeton. Venturi was celebrated with his addition to the Oberlin College Art Museum in Ohio, the National Gallery in London, and the new Seattle Art Museum.

From the Factory Floor

6′ tall double pair of bar doors, in collaboration with Studio William Hefner

Adg Custom Fixture Lighting Project

by Gerald Olesker, CEO, ADG Lighting