adg lighting - architectural detail group

Archives

Adg600

The Perfect Creative Collaboration for Your Lighting Design Needs

ADG Lighting is a leading creative custom design and lighting manufacturing firm. We are fanatical about using our 20 plus years experience to bring to life the vision of clients in a manner that evokes quality and style. This passion for design and quality have made for the perfect partnership with Dering Hall.

Dering Hall is obsessed with quality design and broadening the audience for the best the industry has to offer. Their mission is to assemble a community of the world’s leading creators in one place and to connect them with savvy and sophisticated consumers.

Our collaborative efforts allow us to showcase creativity in a manner that inspires both clients and designers alike. We are proud to share two of our recent features on the Dering Hall platform.

Round & Circular Flush Mounts

Featured in Dering Hall’s Round & Circular Flush Mounts. Kitchens and dining spaces are the ideal locations for flush mount lighting.

Mount Ring Ceiling Flush Fixture

Adg100

 

Vintage Pendant Lights

Featured in Dering Hall’s 40 Vintage Pendant Lights. Vintage and antique accessories add a sophistication and personality to any space in a home.

Vintage Cast Cameo Pendant

Adg200

From The Factory Floor

Our new Pop Pendant shipping out to a happy client!
FullSizeRender 5

Gerald Olesker, CEO, ADG Lighting

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

Adg100

Los Angeles Architecture: Swinging Back to the Roaring Twenties

“You may have a fresh start any moment you choose, for this thing that we call ‘failure’ is not the falling down, but the staying down.”
~ Mary Pickford

Trends in architecture follow the ebb and flow of society. Our architecture reflects the feelings and image we want to project of the community. Each time there is a change, it reflects a fresh start. Los Angeles is embracing that fresh start with a noticeable change in the face of her architecture.

From the best new bars and eateries, we are seeing the emergence of Art Deco style in the architecture of Los Angeles. This is a significant change in the face of the culture and style of the city. For years, the trend was in modern Scandinavian. White walls and blond woods were the face of our architectural and design face across Los Angeles. Now, were are seeing the strong and bold elements of Art Deco sweep across the city, changing the face of our culture, taking it back to the roaring twenties and classic old Hollywood.

Art Deco, sometimes referred to as Deco, is a style of visual arts, architecture and design that first appeared in France just before World War I. It influenced the design of buildings, furniture, jewelry, fashion, cars, movie theaters, trains, ocean liners, and everyday objects such as radios and vacuum cleaners. It took its name, short for Arts Décoratifs, from the Exposition Internationale des Arts Décoratifs et Industriels Modernes (International Exhibition of Modern Decorative and Industrial Arts) held in Paris in 1925. It combined modernist styles with exceptional craftsmanship and luxurious materials. During the height of its popularity, Art Deco represented luxury, glamour, exuberance, and faith in social and technological progress, especially in Hollywood.

Cities usually have a single architectural identity. Los Angeles is known for many. It was an incubator of the American Craftsman style, and it embraced Beaux-Arts, as well as Spanish Colonial Revival and Mayan Revival, which found a powerful advocate in Frank Lloyd Wright. Art Deco arrived in Los Angeles and took over the design of the city during the decades when movie studios became the cornerstone of an economy that had previously relied primarily on oil. It left a stunning cache of public buildings in its wake.

The Art Deco Society of Los Angeles (ADSLA) is a non-profit organization dedicated to the preservation and awareness of Art Deco as a major influence on the 20th century and beyond. The ADSLA has joined with local organizations, as well as Art Deco Societies around the world, to protect the architectural treasures and better educate the public on the importance of historic preservation to the community.

Hot Off the Press

Our work has been featured in California Homes magazine! Thank you and congratulations to Paul Williger Architects and Nancy Isaacs Interior Design for collaborating with us.

CA Homes Sept 2017

 

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

Adg100

Is There an Unknown Architect as Big as Texas?

 

Everything is bigger in Texas! You have heard it before and it is just a fact. Texas is home to nearly 26.5 million people, or 8.4% of the total U.S. population. Most of this population is concentrated around cities including Houston, Dallas, and Austin. The Lone Star State holds a major portion of the U.S. economy. Its total gross domestic product is $1.43 trillion, which is approximately 8.5% of the entire U.S. GDP. Although Texas is primarily known for its oil, it is also the leader in wind power development, and has a large aerospace and aviation industry. Fifty-two Fortune 500 companies including Exxon Mobil, AT&T, and American Airlines are headquartered in Texas.

With that kind of standing behind them, Texans are known to brag about just about everything. If they aren’t bigger and better, they will be soon. So, it becomes quite puzzling to most folks when a Texan’s work is significantly impactful, yet folks just don’t know his name. The Texan that remained so anonymous for so long is renowned architect O’Neil Ford, better known as the Texas godfather of modern architecture.

O’Neil Ford was a renowned architect of the mid-20th century in Texas and a leading architect of the American Southwest. He is considered one of the nation’s best unknown architects, and his designs merged the modernism of Europe with the indigenous qualities of early Texas architecture. In 1974 he was designated a National Historic Landmark by the National Council on the Arts, the only individual to ever be given that title.

His designs include several buildings in Denton, among them the Little Chapel in the Woods, renovations at the Emily Fowler Public Library, the Denton Civic Center, Denton’s City Hall and several buildings at The Selwyn School. Because his designs form much of Denton’s identity, a Texas historical marker honoring Ford was dedicated at the Emily Fowler Library in 2009.

Other Dallas works by Ford include much of the University of Dallas campus in Irving. He designed the Braniff Memorial Tower, the Braniff Graduate Center, the Gorman Lecture Center, parts of the art village, the Haggar University Center, and the Haggerty Science Building.

Many of Ford’s works can also be found in San Antonio. These works include the renovation of La Villita, the campus of Trinity University, the campus of Saint Mary’s Hall, the University of Texas at San Antonio Main Campus, and the Tower of the Americas.

Other significant works by O’Neil Ford include buildings at Skidmore College and several facilities around the world designed for Texas Instruments. Shortly before his death, he completed the design of the building of the Museum of Western Art in Kerrville.

From the Factory Floor

Solid walnut plank to be illuminated on job site!
FullSizeRender 2
by Gerald Olesker, ADG Lighting
Adg100

Don’t Forget Pasadena When You Think of Architecture

When people think of architecture in Los Angeles, their thoughts go immediately to The Eameses, Frank Gehry, and Frank Lloyd Wright, among many others. They were drawn to the sublime light of Los Angeles and were inspired by it.

Like anything else, there are downsides to every attractive part of the city. First and foremost, the traffic! If you live in LA, you known traffic is always going to be a problem and parking is even worse. Then, you have to consider the crowds. Los Angeles is a top global destination for tourists. No matter what your site-seeing adventure in LA, there is going to be a crowd and lines. Wouldn’t be nice to avoid the mind-numbing traffic and growing crowds to take in some great design and architecture? Well, the real secret is…pay a visit to Pasadena.

Pasadena is just 15 miles northwest of Los Angeles, at the foot of the San Gabriel Mountains. Incorporated in 1886, this city of 140,000 retains much of its 19th-century charm. Here are a few examples of places to visit in the Pasadena area to get your design fix:

1. Norton Museum of Art – A private museum founded in 1922 as the Pasadena Art Institute, later becoming the Pasadena Art Museum. Industrialist Norton Simon, who collected European masterpieces from the Renaissance to the 20th century, as well as Asian art spanning 2,000 years, took it over in 1974. It is considered one of the world’s finest small art museums, gaining praise for its renovations by famed architect Frank Gehry.
2. Old Town Pasadena – This 22-block historical area has kept many of its 19th century roots, thanks to historic preservation. It was designated a National Register Historic District in 1983, and remains full of Victorian, Mission Revival and Art Deco buildings that give off a European vibe with its pedestrian-friendly streets and historic alleys.
3. The Langham Huntington – This historic hotel originally opened in 1907 and was redesigned seven years later by Rose Bowl architect Myron Hunt. It added the first Olympic-sized swimming pool in Southern California in the mid-1920s and is now famous for its lovely wooden Picture Bridge, used as a backdrop in movies and TV shows.
4. The Gamble House – The Gamble House was designed as a winter residence in 1908 by architects Greene & Greene for David Berry Gamble, a second-generation member of the Cincinnati-based Procter & Gamble Co. family, and his wife, Mary. It is renowned as an outstanding example of American Arts and Crafts style architecture.

No matter what your travel plans are, Pasadena has world-class design and architectural destinations that will give you a taste of the past, present and the future, all within a compact 23-mile radius.

Check out this video walking tour of Old Town Pasadena.

From the Design Studio

1920’s beach cottage project

Unnamed

sketched by Gerald Olesker

grand canyon, mary colter, american architecture

American Architecture – The Grand Canyon and Mary Colter

The Grand Canyon is 277 miles long, up to 18 miles wide and attains a depth of over a mile. Nearly two billion years of Earth’s geological history have been exposed as the Colorado River and its tributaries cut their channels through layer after layer of rock while the Colorado Plateau was uplifted.

One of the seven natural wonders of the world and one of the first national parks in the United States, the Grand Canyon receives millions of visitors every year who view the steep gorge carved by the Colorado River into the Colorado Plateau. Most visit the easy-to-access South Rim, and some hike to its depths or traverse its length river-rafting.

Mary Elizabeth Jane Colter was an architect and designer. She was one of the very few female architects of her day. She was most notably the designer of many landmark buildings and spaces for the Fred Harvey Company and the Santa Fe Railroad, notably in Grand Canyon National Park. Her work had enormous influence as she helped to create a style, blending Spanish Colonial Revival and Mission Revival architecture with Native American motifs and rustic elements that became popular throughout the Southwest.

Colter created a series of renowed works in the Grand Canyon National Park. Among her work is the 1905 Hopi House, the 1914 Hermit’s Rest and observatory Lookout Studio, and the 1932 Desert View Watchtower, a 70-foot-tall rock tower with a hidden steel structure, as well as the 1935 Bright Angel Lodge complex, and the 1922 Phantom Ranch buildings at the bottom of the canyon. She also decorated the park’s El Tovar Hotel. In 1987, the Mary Jane Colter Buildings, as a group, were listed as a National Historic Landmark.

From the Factory Floor

Our new sconce for Tiffany Harris Design

factory design, custom lighting, adg lighting

by ADG Lighting

mid-century modern, architecture, las vegas, adg lighting blog

Mid-Century Modern Homes Live on in Las Vegas

Las Vegas! When you hear the name, it evokes the image of bright lights and expansive hotels. The Vegas strip lights up the western sky and the glow can be seen for miles at night.

The city bills itself as The Entertainment Capital of the World, and is famous for its mega casino–hotels and associated activities. It is a top three destination in the United States for business conventions and a global leader in the hospitality industry, claiming more AAA Five Diamond hotels than any city in the world.

Interest in the architecture of Las Vegas began in the late 1960s, when in 1967 architects Robert Venturi and Denise Scott Brown travelled to the city accompanied by students in order to study its architecture. Venturi’s architecture has had worldwide influence, beginning in the late 1960s with the dissemination of the broken-gable roof of the Vanna Venturi House and the segmentally arched window and interrupted string courses of Guild House. The playful variations on vernacular house types seen in the Trubeck and Wislocki Houses offered a new way to embrace, but transform, familiar forms. The facade patterning of the Oberlin Art Museum and the laboratory buildings demonstrated a treatment of the vertical surfaces of buildings that is both decorative and abstract, drawing from vernacular and historic architecture while still being modern.

In 1972, with Venturi and Steven Izenour, Scott Brown wrote Learning From Las Vegas: the Forgotten Symbolism of Architectural Form. The book published studies of the Las Vegas Strip, undertaken with students in a research studio Scott Brown taught with Venturi in 1970 at Yale’s School of Architecture and Planning. The book joined Venturi’s previous Complexity and Contradiction in Architecture (Museum of Modern Art, 1966) as a rebuke to orthodox modernism and elite architectural tastes, and a pointed acceptance of American sprawl and vernacular architecture. The book coined the terms “duck” and “decorated shed” as applied to opposing architectural styles. Scott Brown has remained a prolific writer on architecture and urban planning.

Scott Brown and Robert Venturi strove for understanding the city in terms of social, economic and cultural perspectives, viewing it as a set of complex systems upon planning. Prior to design, the Venturi, Scott Brown & Associates firm studies the trends of the area, marking future expansions or congestions. These studies influence plans and design makeup.

Mid-Century Modern in Las Vegas

Get past the tract homes and the millionaire castles that cover the landscape of Las Vegas, and you will find jewels of mid-century modern style homes. The 1950s and 60s were a time of tremendous growth and architectural experimentation in the U.S., which was mirrored in the Las Vegas valley.

The postwar construction boom in Las Vegas led to the creation of some of the country’s largest concentrations of mid-century modern houses. In a lot of other places the mid-modern homes were built in a ring around the city. Most of our mid-modern homes are clustered in more central locations, not too far off of the Strip. It has made Las Vegas a destination for mid-modern enthusiasts. Mid-century modern homes are typically built low with open floor plans, flat planes, large windows and the use of repeating patterns and natural materials, such as rough stone.

Paradise Palms has 1022 mid-century modern homes and is nestled near the Las Vegas National Golf Course, just minutes to the world famous Las Vegas Strip.  Paradise Palms homes were built between the years of 1960-1979.

With the revitalization of downtown Las Vegas, urban living has become wildly popular. These classic homes with vintage character and some even with a flair of historic backgrounds are very appealing to all types of buyers.

 

From the Design Studio

Quick sketch of a lantern for a new project

from the design studio, adg lighting

by Gerald Olesker, ADG Lighting