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Category Archives: Los Angeles

archtoberfest, architecture, adg lighting

Let’s Celebrate Archtober Fest 2017

October is the month we set aside to celebrate all things architecture. Archtober Fest is a away to bring awareness and appreciation to the art and science of architecture. Across the U.S., various cities are celebrating Archtober Fest to bring awareness forward and celebrate the architectural landmarks that their great communities offer.

The earliest surviving written work on the subject of architecture is De architectura, by the Roman architect Vitruvius in the early 1st century AD. According to Vitruvius, a good building should satisfy the three principles of firmitas, utilitas, venustas. Our modern day equivalent would be durability, utility and beauty. According to Vitruvius, the architect should strive to fulfill each of these three attributes as well as possible.

Architecture is both the process and the product of planning, designing, and constructing buildings and other physical structures. Architectural works, in the material form of buildings, are often perceived as cultural symbols and as works of art. Historical civilizations are often identified with their surviving architectural achievements.

Here are some links to two of the best Archtober celebrations across the country:

NYC Archtober Fest – New York City’s Architecture and Design Month, the seventh annual month-long festival of architecture activities, programs and exhibitions taking place during the month.

San Diego Archtober Fest – San Diego’s Architecture and Design Month, celebration of San Diego’s built environment, will kick off with a rapid-fire show-and-tell, tours and talks, and conclude with awards for good and bad buildings.

In the spirit of the celebration, get out and explore the architecture of your city and region. It is all around us, but we tend to be focused on the day-to-day of our lives and miss the creative beauty that is all around us. Through their artistic and technical skills, architects translate the experiences of the culture into buildings that mark the passing of time.

From the ADG Jobsite

New custom designed lights in Malibu
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By Gerald Olesker, CEO ADG Lighting

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The Perfect Creative Collaboration for Your Lighting Design Needs

ADG Lighting is a leading creative custom design and lighting manufacturing firm. We are fanatical about using our 20 plus years experience to bring to life the vision of clients in a manner that evokes quality and style. This passion for design and quality have made for the perfect partnership with Dering Hall.

Dering Hall is obsessed with quality design and broadening the audience for the best the industry has to offer. Their mission is to assemble a community of the world’s leading creators in one place and to connect them with savvy and sophisticated consumers.

Our collaborative efforts allow us to showcase creativity in a manner that inspires both clients and designers alike. We are proud to share two of our recent features on the Dering Hall platform.

Round & Circular Flush Mounts

Featured in Dering Hall’s Round & Circular Flush Mounts. Kitchens and dining spaces are the ideal locations for flush mount lighting.

Mount Ring Ceiling Flush Fixture

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Vintage Pendant Lights

Featured in Dering Hall’s 40 Vintage Pendant Lights. Vintage and antique accessories add a sophistication and personality to any space in a home.

Vintage Cast Cameo Pendant

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From The Factory Floor

Our new Pop Pendant shipping out to a happy client!
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Gerald Olesker, CEO, ADG Lighting

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Los Angeles Architecture: Swinging Back to the Roaring Twenties

“You may have a fresh start any moment you choose, for this thing that we call ‘failure’ is not the falling down, but the staying down.”
~ Mary Pickford

Trends in architecture follow the ebb and flow of society. Our architecture reflects the feelings and image we want to project of the community. Each time there is a change, it reflects a fresh start. Los Angeles is embracing that fresh start with a noticeable change in the face of her architecture.

From the best new bars and eateries, we are seeing the emergence of Art Deco style in the architecture of Los Angeles. This is a significant change in the face of the culture and style of the city. For years, the trend was in modern Scandinavian. White walls and blond woods were the face of our architectural and design face across Los Angeles. Now, were are seeing the strong and bold elements of Art Deco sweep across the city, changing the face of our culture, taking it back to the roaring twenties and classic old Hollywood.

Art Deco, sometimes referred to as Deco, is a style of visual arts, architecture and design that first appeared in France just before World War I. It influenced the design of buildings, furniture, jewelry, fashion, cars, movie theaters, trains, ocean liners, and everyday objects such as radios and vacuum cleaners. It took its name, short for Arts Décoratifs, from the Exposition Internationale des Arts Décoratifs et Industriels Modernes (International Exhibition of Modern Decorative and Industrial Arts) held in Paris in 1925. It combined modernist styles with exceptional craftsmanship and luxurious materials. During the height of its popularity, Art Deco represented luxury, glamour, exuberance, and faith in social and technological progress, especially in Hollywood.

Cities usually have a single architectural identity. Los Angeles is known for many. It was an incubator of the American Craftsman style, and it embraced Beaux-Arts, as well as Spanish Colonial Revival and Mayan Revival, which found a powerful advocate in Frank Lloyd Wright. Art Deco arrived in Los Angeles and took over the design of the city during the decades when movie studios became the cornerstone of an economy that had previously relied primarily on oil. It left a stunning cache of public buildings in its wake.

The Art Deco Society of Los Angeles (ADSLA) is a non-profit organization dedicated to the preservation and awareness of Art Deco as a major influence on the 20th century and beyond. The ADSLA has joined with local organizations, as well as Art Deco Societies around the world, to protect the architectural treasures and better educate the public on the importance of historic preservation to the community.

Hot Off the Press

Our work has been featured in California Homes magazine! Thank you and congratulations to Paul Williger Architects and Nancy Isaacs Interior Design for collaborating with us.

CA Homes Sept 2017

 

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Lego House – The Creative Toy Comes To Life In Denmark

Those iconic bricks that have inspired the architect in children around the world have finally come to life in Billund, Denmark. The LEGO House is a building under construction and set to open in September 2017, in the city of the factory of LEGO. The house will be designed entirely in the brick-by-brick aesthetic of LEGO. The building will serve as part public art piece, tourist attraction, LEGO store, and cafe. It will also have 20,000 square feet set aside for open space.

LEGO House offers children and adults an amazing opportunity to combine bricks and creativity, creating the ultimate play date. The layout of LEGO House follows the structure of the five learning zone competences activated through play. Each brightly color-coded zone has bundled together some really awesome play activities that are there for you to explore.

In the midst of LEGO House stands one of the world’s most iconic LEGO models. The Tree of Creativity is over 40 feet tall and packed full of details the most avid LEGO enthusiast cannot fail to be impressed by. The base and roots of the tree represent the LEGO Group foundation in wooden toys, and at the very top LEGO mini-figure workers are building new branches using a giant crane — just like LEGO House itself. The unique LEGO model is built by hand from 6,316,611 standard LEGO bricks and took 24,350 hours to assemble.

LEGO House is designed by Bjarke Angel Group (BIG). According to the founding architect Bjarke Ingels, the idea for LEGO House was to create a cloud of interlocking LEGO bricks… a literal manifestation of the infinite possibilities of the LEGO brick. Twenty-one white bricks are stacked on top of each other, crowned by the Keystone. These huge bricks not only form internal spaces for LEGO House activities, but they also create a covered public square and a series of interconnected terraces and playgrounds for guests to investigate and enjoy. This ensures that LEGO House can be enjoyed both by fans who come to experience the LEGO story and by local residents and visitors to the town of Billund.

From the ADG Job Site

Leather wrapped iron and bronze chandelier for happy ADG client Tiffany Harris Design!
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by Gerald Olesker, ADG Lighting

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Is There an Unknown Architect as Big as Texas?

 

Everything is bigger in Texas! You have heard it before and it is just a fact. Texas is home to nearly 26.5 million people, or 8.4% of the total U.S. population. Most of this population is concentrated around cities including Houston, Dallas, and Austin. The Lone Star State holds a major portion of the U.S. economy. Its total gross domestic product is $1.43 trillion, which is approximately 8.5% of the entire U.S. GDP. Although Texas is primarily known for its oil, it is also the leader in wind power development, and has a large aerospace and aviation industry. Fifty-two Fortune 500 companies including Exxon Mobil, AT&T, and American Airlines are headquartered in Texas.

With that kind of standing behind them, Texans are known to brag about just about everything. If they aren’t bigger and better, they will be soon. So, it becomes quite puzzling to most folks when a Texan’s work is significantly impactful, yet folks just don’t know his name. The Texan that remained so anonymous for so long is renowned architect O’Neil Ford, better known as the Texas godfather of modern architecture.

O’Neil Ford was a renowned architect of the mid-20th century in Texas and a leading architect of the American Southwest. He is considered one of the nation’s best unknown architects, and his designs merged the modernism of Europe with the indigenous qualities of early Texas architecture. In 1974 he was designated a National Historic Landmark by the National Council on the Arts, the only individual to ever be given that title.

His designs include several buildings in Denton, among them the Little Chapel in the Woods, renovations at the Emily Fowler Public Library, the Denton Civic Center, Denton’s City Hall and several buildings at The Selwyn School. Because his designs form much of Denton’s identity, a Texas historical marker honoring Ford was dedicated at the Emily Fowler Library in 2009.

Other Dallas works by Ford include much of the University of Dallas campus in Irving. He designed the Braniff Memorial Tower, the Braniff Graduate Center, the Gorman Lecture Center, parts of the art village, the Haggar University Center, and the Haggerty Science Building.

Many of Ford’s works can also be found in San Antonio. These works include the renovation of La Villita, the campus of Trinity University, the campus of Saint Mary’s Hall, the University of Texas at San Antonio Main Campus, and the Tower of the Americas.

Other significant works by O’Neil Ford include buildings at Skidmore College and several facilities around the world designed for Texas Instruments. Shortly before his death, he completed the design of the building of the Museum of Western Art in Kerrville.

From the Factory Floor

Solid walnut plank to be illuminated on job site!
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by Gerald Olesker, ADG Lighting
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Passing of an Acclaimed Architect

“As we live and as we are, Simplicity – with a capital “S” – is difficult to comprehend nowadays. We are no longer truly simple. We no longer live in simple terms or places. Life is a more complex struggle now. It is now valiant to be simple: a courageous thing to even want to be simple. It is a spiritual thing to comprehend what simplicity means.”

― Frank Lloyd Wright

Gunnar Birkerts, an acclaimed Detroit-area architect who designed major buildings throughout the Midwest, including the former Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis and an addition to the University of Michigan Law Library, passed on Tuesday.

Birkerts was a Latvian-American architect who, for most of his career, was based in the metropolitan area of Detroit, Michigan. His designs include the Corning Museum of Glass and the Corning Fire Station in Corning, New York, Marquette Plaza in Minneapolis, Minnesota, the Kemper Museum of Contemporary Art in Kansas City, Missouri, and the U.S. Embassy in Caracas, Venezuela. In 2014, he designed the National Library of Latvia in Riga, Latvia (aka the Castle of Light), whose architectural form references and draws inspiration from Latvian folklore.

He was a Fellow of the American Institute of Architects in 1970, and a Fellow of the Latvian Architect Association in 1971. Birkerts was the recipient of numerous individual awards, including a 1971 fellowship from the Graham Foundation, the Gold Medal of the Michigan Society of Architects in 1980, the Arnold W. Brunner Memorial Prize in Architecture of the American Academy and Institute of Arts and Letters in 1981, and the 1993 Michigan Artist of the Year award.

From The Factory Floor

ADG team member Fabien von Heyden checking out our new bright yellow 39 foot long lights for Bluewater Grill.
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by ADG Lighting, Gerald Olesker