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Monthly Archives: April 2018

La Fi Hotprop Carroll Oconnor Broad Beach 20180328

Celebrity Malibu Beach Home Hits the Market

Renovated Smart Home Features Custom Designs of Premier Firm ADG Lighting

Another celebrity estate has hit the real estate market in the coveted neighborhood of Broad Beach, situated in the northern area of Malibu. 

Renovated by noted architect and interior designer Michael Lee, the former estate of “All in the Family” actor Carroll O’Connor is adorned with modern lanterns designed and manufactured by ADG Lighting in both the pool area and at the stairway. 

The two-level, 3,700 square foot home is located at 30826 Broad Beach Road, and comes with a sauna, four cabana style bedrooms with en-suite bathrooms and french doors. This smart home also comes equipped with solar panels and Tesla battery backup. 

Gerald Olesker, founder and CEO of ADG Lighting, was thrilled at the outcome of the renovation. “The beauty of the location, combined with the Moroccan architecture of the home, made this project a masterpiece,” said Olesker. 

Gerald Olesker applies his background as a trained architect on all of the custom design projects he has worked on. His firm has several projects in the works across Los Angeles, Chicago, San Francisco and in major cities across the country. ADG Lighting’s custom work can be seen in showrooms across the country, with locations in West Hollywood, Austin, and San Luis Obispo. 

The home is currently listed by DeeDee Cortese of Coldwell Banker Malibu.

Broadway District Los Angeles

The Broadway District Rises Again

“I remember walking into those opulent interiors, surrounded by the glory of the Renaissance, or the age of Baroque, and spending two or three hours in the dream world of the movies. When I came out again the sky blazed; the heat bounced off the sidewalk, traffic sounds filled the street, I was back in the hard reality of the Depression.”

Jack Smith, Los Angeles Times Columnist

By the 1930’s, the Broadway District in Los Angeles had the highest concentration of cinemas in the world and was by far the most famous street in the US. The ornamental baroque style theaters were witness to unprecedented growth of an industry and a downtown region. Like every meteoric growth spurt, there came an equally dynamic fall from grace. The new film industry chose to move operations to a more glamorous Hollywood, and the downtown area of Los Angeles started to slide into economic decline. Before long, Downtown Los Angeles found itself in a state of despair and abandoned by its residents. It was deemed a very dangerous place to be, and the luxurious heyday of the baroque theaters were now surrounded by squalor.

The Broadway District has started to regain its life and splendor through the efforts of many who were passionate never to let this glorious area of Downtown Los Angeles be lost to the wrecking ball. In May of 1979, the district was added to the National Register of Historic Places and is the largest theater district listed on the register. It remains the largest concentration of movie palaces remaining in the US. With that designation in place, groups such as the Los Angeles Conservancy, the Bringing Back Broadway Initiative, the Broadway Theater Group and the Los Angeles Historic Theater Foundation went to work to revive this glorious area of Downtown Los Angeles. Because of their efforts, Angelenos can now enjoy performances and events in these spectacular venues.

Levitated Broadway is the latest plan to preserve and protect the Broadway District in its original glory, while accommodating the needs of an ever-growing population in Los Angeles. Instead of demolishing some of the old buildings, the plan is to take advantage of space between and on top of the existing structures. This will create new public spaces in the middle of a high-density location, while preserving the integrity and glory of the old district structures and venues.

From the ADG Worksite

Iron lantern at a client’s property

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by Gerald Olesker, CEO, ADG Lighting

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Antwerp, Belgium, Historical Architecture

The Historic Architecture of the Antwerp Central Railway Station

Widely considered the finest and most beautiful railway station in the world, the Antwerp Central Railway station has reigned supreme since 1905. The original construction occurred between 1895 and 1905 as a replacement for the original terminal building. Louis Delacenserie designed the stone class terminal with a vast regal dome over the main waiting area.

Louis Delacenserie was a Belgian architect from Bruges. His father was a merchant and building contractor from Tournai. At the pinnacle of his career, Delacenserie made use of a rather eclectic Neo-Renaissance style for the station, which reflected the economic and artistic theme of the city in the 16th century. Some aspects of the station, like the use of colors and materials, were clearly influenced by art nouveau architecture.

During World War II, the station suffered damage to the train hall by German V2 flying bombs without destroying the structural viability of the building. The impact of the bombing can still be seen today in a lasting wave-distortion in the roofing of  the main hall.  By the mid-twentieth century, the building had deteriorated far enough where there was serious consideration for demolition. Ultimately, the decision was made to save her and a major restoration was undertaken.  This was completed in 1986. In 1998, a large-scale reconstruction project began to adapt the grand station from a terminus to a through station and to accommodate high-speed rail. This project was completed in 2007 and the grand station was awarded a Grand Prix at the European Union Prize for Culture Heritage/Europa Nostra Award in 2011.

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Antwerp Central Railway station is a ‘must-see’ if you are traveling anywhere in Europe. The style and design of this elegant building is a classic and is so rarely seen anywhere in the world. It reflects the vision and elegance of the times in Western Europe. With proper care and attention to the great value of the structure, it is hoped that caretakers can properly preserve her for future generations to enjoy the splendors.

From the ADG Jobsite

New home waiting for custom lighting from ADG…

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by Gerald Olesker, CEO, ADG Lighting

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Flathead Co Whitefish Main Street FLW 8

The Spiteful Destruction of a Frank Lloyd Wright Building

Over two months ago, a real estate developer in Whitefish, Montana, demolished the Lockridge Medical Center. This building was the only structure in the state of Montana designed by Frank Lloyd Wright. This demolition also sets a dubious record as being the only Frank Lloyd Wright building destroyed in over 40 years.

The Lockridge Medical Center was designed by Wright in 1958 for three doctors, T. L. Lockridge, John T. Whalen and Bruce C. McIntyre. The construction on the Lockridge Medical Center started in 1961 and was completed in 1963, long after Wright’s death in 1959. It was occupied by the doctors for only a single year. The 5,000 square foot building was a low, single-story horizontally oriented structure. It was built of brick and cast concrete, which featured Frank Lloyd Wright’s typical horizontally-raked mortar joints, with interior and exterior brick.

The developer who purchased the site in 2016, stated that his vision was to demolish the building and construct a 3-story commercial retail space. At the time of the purchase, they were unaware of the historical significance of the building. Once the information became available to the developer, they were unimpressed with the historical value and pressed on with their plans. The goal of the new commercial space was to capitalize on visitor traffic from the nearby Glacier National Park. Activists and historical preservationists quickly engaged with the developer to halt the development plans, and proceeded to raise $1.7 million to purchase the property. At the end of the day, as pressure built from local and national interests, the developer demolished the property in one overnight event.

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The outcry was swift and loud, causing a significant backlash in the architectural community. In the spirit of the recent Oscar-nominated movie “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri,” a billboard quickly appeared in the town. The billboard attacked the destruction of the historical building and the reprehensible act of the developer. The identity of the person(s) posting the billboard remains unknown. The Frank Lloyd Wright Building Conservancy and the Montana Preservation Alliance, two groups that actively fought to save the structure, have disavowed any knowledge of the posting.

We admire the legacy of Frank Lloyd Wright. We were honored to have worked on the Mat House in Reseda, California, designed by Frank’s son Lloyd Wright and known for its distinctive angular, thatch-like roof. The house was granted historic landmark status in 1996.

From the Showroom Floor

A view from Frog Pad, our newest showroom location in Austin, Texas!

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by Gerald Olesker, CEO, ADG Lighting