adg lighting - architectural detail group

Monthly Archives: August 2017

Adg1

Passing of an Acclaimed Architect

“As we live and as we are, Simplicity – with a capital “S” – is difficult to comprehend nowadays. We are no longer truly simple. We no longer live in simple terms or places. Life is a more complex struggle now. It is now valiant to be simple: a courageous thing to even want to be simple. It is a spiritual thing to comprehend what simplicity means.”

― Frank Lloyd Wright

Gunnar Birkerts, an acclaimed Detroit-area architect who designed major buildings throughout the Midwest, including the former Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis and an addition to the University of Michigan Law Library, passed on Tuesday.

Birkerts was a Latvian-American architect who, for most of his career, was based in the metropolitan area of Detroit, Michigan. His designs include the Corning Museum of Glass and the Corning Fire Station in Corning, New York, Marquette Plaza in Minneapolis, Minnesota, the Kemper Museum of Contemporary Art in Kansas City, Missouri, and the U.S. Embassy in Caracas, Venezuela. In 2014, he designed the National Library of Latvia in Riga, Latvia (aka the Castle of Light), whose architectural form references and draws inspiration from Latvian folklore.

He was a Fellow of the American Institute of Architects in 1970, and a Fellow of the Latvian Architect Association in 1971. Birkerts was the recipient of numerous individual awards, including a 1971 fellowship from the Graham Foundation, the Gold Medal of the Michigan Society of Architects in 1980, the Arnold W. Brunner Memorial Prize in Architecture of the American Academy and Institute of Arts and Letters in 1981, and the 1993 Michigan Artist of the Year award.

From The Factory Floor

ADG team member Fabien von Heyden checking out our new bright yellow 39 foot long lights for Bluewater Grill.
FullSizeRender
by ADG Lighting, Gerald Olesker
Chartwell Estate

Luxury Homes – The Most Expensive Are in Bel Air

Is it really a surprise that the most expensive home on the market in the U.S. is in Bel Air? Probably not. But, with the latest entry into the market, Bel Air holds the record now for having the top 3 most expensive homes on the market.

Bel Air is a neighborhood in the Westside area of Los Angeles, in the foothills of the Santa Monica Mountains. The community was founded in 1923 by Alphonzo Bell. He owned farm property in Santa Fe Springs, where oil was discovered. Bell bought a large ranch with a home on what is now Bel Air Road. He subdivided and developed the property with large residential lots. He also built the Bel Air Beach Club in Santa Monica and the Bel Air Country Club. Bell’s wife chose Italian names for the streets and subsequently founded the Bel Air Garden Club in 1931.

The newest entry in the Bel Air market is a property known as Chartwell. It hits the market at a price of $350 million. Chartwell was the estate of late Univision chairman Jerrold Perenchio. It sits on more than 10 acres, with a main house that measures 25,000 square feet. The property also includes a ballroom, a wine cellar and a period-paneled dining room. Perenchio purchased the home in 1986 and had it remodeled to more closely resemble the original design of an authentic 18th-century French chateau. Afterward, he bought many of the surrounding properties, expanding the compound to nearly 13 acres of land. The exterior of the home was used in shots of the hit TV sitcom “The Beverly Hillbillies.”

Bel Air has always been a district for the super-rich. Its Mediterranean architectural style and lavishly landscaped grounds quickly became the address of choice for LA society. Judy Garland, Elizabeth Taylor and Alfred Hitchcock were all residents of the exclusive Bel Air.

From the ADG Lighting Job Site

A custom selection of ADG lanterns…

ADG Custon Lighting Architecture 080917

Adg100

Don’t Forget Pasadena When You Think of Architecture

When people think of architecture in Los Angeles, their thoughts go immediately to The Eameses, Frank Gehry, and Frank Lloyd Wright, among many others. They were drawn to the sublime light of Los Angeles and were inspired by it.

Like anything else, there are downsides to every attractive part of the city. First and foremost, the traffic! If you live in LA, you known traffic is always going to be a problem and parking is even worse. Then, you have to consider the crowds. Los Angeles is a top global destination for tourists. No matter what your site-seeing adventure in LA, there is going to be a crowd and lines. Wouldn’t be nice to avoid the mind-numbing traffic and growing crowds to take in some great design and architecture? Well, the real secret is…pay a visit to Pasadena.

Pasadena is just 15 miles northwest of Los Angeles, at the foot of the San Gabriel Mountains. Incorporated in 1886, this city of 140,000 retains much of its 19th-century charm. Here are a few examples of places to visit in the Pasadena area to get your design fix:

1. Norton Museum of Art – A private museum founded in 1922 as the Pasadena Art Institute, later becoming the Pasadena Art Museum. Industrialist Norton Simon, who collected European masterpieces from the Renaissance to the 20th century, as well as Asian art spanning 2,000 years, took it over in 1974. It is considered one of the world’s finest small art museums, gaining praise for its renovations by famed architect Frank Gehry.
2. Old Town Pasadena – This 22-block historical area has kept many of its 19th century roots, thanks to historic preservation. It was designated a National Register Historic District in 1983, and remains full of Victorian, Mission Revival and Art Deco buildings that give off a European vibe with its pedestrian-friendly streets and historic alleys.
3. The Langham Huntington – This historic hotel originally opened in 1907 and was redesigned seven years later by Rose Bowl architect Myron Hunt. It added the first Olympic-sized swimming pool in Southern California in the mid-1920s and is now famous for its lovely wooden Picture Bridge, used as a backdrop in movies and TV shows.
4. The Gamble House – The Gamble House was designed as a winter residence in 1908 by architects Greene & Greene for David Berry Gamble, a second-generation member of the Cincinnati-based Procter & Gamble Co. family, and his wife, Mary. It is renowned as an outstanding example of American Arts and Crafts style architecture.

No matter what your travel plans are, Pasadena has world-class design and architectural destinations that will give you a taste of the past, present and the future, all within a compact 23-mile radius.

Check out this video walking tour of Old Town Pasadena.

From the Design Studio

1920’s beach cottage project

Unnamed

sketched by Gerald Olesker